#953 (9/30/21)

SPOTLIGHT ON SAVOY RECORDS - PART THREE (1950 - 1952)

THE FOUR BUDDIES
LINDA HOPKINS
LITTLE SYLVIA
THE FALCONS
BILLY WRIGHT
MEL WALKER
"(IT'S NO) SIN" RECORDS
BONUS: SCAMPS/FIVE THRILLS

Includes Audio For Thirty-Five Songs
(Audio Restored By Dave Saviet - Images Restored By Tony Fournier)


THE FOUR BUDDIES:
Above Left: The Four Buddies were from Baltimore. In above photo (from June 1951): Top (L-R) Tommy Carter (bass), Bert Palmer (baritone); Bottom (L-R) Gregory Carroll (second tenor), Leon "Larry" Harrison (lead tenor).

Above Right: Another photo of The Four Buddies, (L-R) Leon Harrison, Gregory Carroll, Tommy Carter, and Bert Palmer.

The Four Buddies' only records were on the Savoy label. They had eight records under their own name (1950-1953). Also, one side as The Beltones backing Little Esther (1950) [covered in Savoy Records - Part Two], and one side backing Dolly Cooper as The Four Buddies (1953) [will be covered in Savoy Records - Part Four].

Leon Harrison formed a new group, The Barons, resulting in two records on the Decca label in 1954 [will be covered in Savoy Records - Part Four]. The Barons then became The Buddies retaining Harrison and two other members. They had one record on the Glory label in 1955.

Above: TRADE MAGAZINE, December 1950.
(Notice the "by the 4 Buds" in the clipping. The "Rockin' Blues" record is included in SAVOY RECORDS - PART TWO.)
Above: Label images for Savoy 769-A and 769-B, recorded on October 12, 1950 and released in December 1950. "John Carroll", composer of the "B" side, is Gregory Carroll, a member of The Four Buds (Buddies).

The record was reissued in December 1950 as by The Four Buddies, which was considered to be a better name for them. "I Will Wait" became a national rhythm and blues hit, firmly initiating their future value to the Savoy label.

This record is actually their second record for Savoy. Their first is under the name The Beltones (née Metronomes) backing Little Esther.
(That record is included in SAVOY RECORDS - PART TWO.)

Above: TRADE MAGAZINE, February 1951.

The Cash Box Review (1/6/51):

THE FOUR BUDS — Savoy 769.... "I Will Wait"/"Just To See You Smile Again"
A couple of ballads are offered here by the Four Buds. Doing it in the style of a vocal solo with a harmonizing group, the boys get some good feeling into these as they run through them in familiar style. Ops who are in the market for good stock material oughta listen to these sides.
Above: TRADE MAGAZINE, March 1951. (The "Keep Your Hands On Your Heart" and "Doggin' Blues" records are included further down on this webpage.)
Above: THE BILLBOARD, June 23, 1951. (The "Stacked Deck" record is included further down on this webpage.)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "I Will Wait" - The Four Buds - Savoy 769-A - 1951.
2. "Just To See You Smile Again" - The Four Buds - Savoy 769-B - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Above: Label images for Savoy 779-A, recorded on January 13, 1951 and Savoy 779-B, recorded on October 12, 1950. The record was released in February 1951. Note that Leon Harrison, the group's lead singer, gets composer credit on the "B" side.


THE CASH BOX REVIEW — MARCH 10, 1951
The Billboard Review (3/3/51):
THE FOUR BUDDIES — Savoy 779....
Sweet Slumber
(83) Quartet socks thru with a smooth, insinuating slow ballad job. Lead tenor has a persuasive, intimate, note-bend attack that should snare attention.
Don't Leave Me Now (81) Another very persuasive, intimate job on a likely slow ballad.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 80-89 was considered "excellent".)

Above: TRADE MAGAZINE, June 1951.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Sweet Slumber" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 779-A - 1951.
2. "Don't Leave Me Now" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 779-B - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


BONUS RECORD—THE SCAMPS:
Above Left: Photo of The Five Scamps from 1949. Shown are: (L-R) Edward Stafford, James Whitcomb, Earl Robinson, Rudy Massingale, and Wyatt Griffin. This is the group on the "Sweet Slumber" record, except Torrence Griffin replaces Stafford.

Above Right: Label image for Modern Music 20-521B. This record was released in May 1947. Notice there aren't any composer credits on the label. The song had been previously released by Lucky Millinder And His Orchestra on Decca in 1943, with Trevor Bacon doing the vocal.

THE BILLBOARD, April 19, 1947:
....The Scamps, Kansas City Negro harmony group, have been inked by the Modern Music label....

The Cash Box Review (8/25/47):

THE SCAMPS — Savoy 769.... "I'm Falling For You"/"Sweet Slumber"
A biscuit that has been pressed into something romantic, slow and soft, for those spots on your route where the customers like to hear that soothing wail of a good voice backed by neat piano playing. It's a really restful hunk of wax with both sides about equal. If you've got those dim lit tavern spots where they like their romance slow and easy, you’ll do good with this disk.

Click HERE for an article about The Scamps by Marv Goldberg. (Will open in a separate window)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): "Sweet Slumber" - The Scamps - Modern Music 20-521B - 1947.

Above: Label images for Savoy 789-A, recorded on January 13, 1951 and Savoy 789-B, recorded on October 12, 1950. The record was released in June 1951. Composer Vernon Palmer on the "B" side is Bert Palmer, a member of The Four Buddies.


THE CASH BOX REVIEW — JUNE 16, 1951
The Billboard Review (3/3/51):
THE FOUR BUDDIES — Savoy 789....
My Summer's Gone
(83) Male group comes thru with a sock side in this summery ballad. Unusual lead singer's style is most effective.
Why, At A Time Like This? (72) This ballad effort is paled by flip.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 70-79 was considered "good" and 80-89 "excellent".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "My Summer's Gone" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 789-A - 1951.
2. "Why, At A Time Like This" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 789-B - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


BONUS RECORD—THE FIVE THRILLS:
(The title is different, but "My Baby's Gone" is the same song as "My Summer's Gone".)
Above Left: Photo of The Five Thrills, a Chicago group consisting of Gilbert Warren (lead tenor), Fred Washington (baritone), Obie Washington (second tenor), Oscar Robinson (baritone) and Levi Jenkins (bass). Fred and Obie were brothers. Jenkins also played piano for the group. (NOTE: Disco-File shows James Bradley as another member of the group.) In 1955, Warren had two releases on Parrot with The Orchids.

Above Right: Label image for Parrot 796 recorded in October 1953. The record was released in January 1954. It is the first of two on Parrot by the group.

This side is a direct copy of "My Summer's Gone". Note that "My Baby's Gone" is never sung as part of the song. The flip-side, "Feel So Good" is a blatant copy of The Five Keys' "Serve Another Round", with Fred Washington given composer credit on the label.

Parrot Records existed from mid-1953 to early 1956. It's subsidiary label, Blue Lake, began in 1954 and also closed in early 1956.

At Left: THE BILLBOARD, January 9, 1954. Note that "Feel So Good" was the side being pushed by Al Benson, head of Parrot Records. "Jan (Part 1 & 2)" is a two-sided instrumental.

THE BILLBOARD, January 16, 1954: BENSON HITS HOT SELLERS
CHICAGO—Al Benson, noted deejay of Station WGES, this city, and also headman of Parrot Records, was thrilled to learn from George and Ernie Leaner of United Record Distributors here, as well as from other of his distributors around the nation, that he has hit on two hot sellers in his newest Parrot releases.

These are, "Jan", parts one and two, by Paul Bascomb, and "Feel So Good" by the Five Thrills. Benson stated, “We’re on our way into the top spots on all charts with these two new releases. Sales here in Chicago passed the 7,000 mark the very first week", he continued, "and reorders which we have received from all over the country, where first orders were filled, convince us at Parrot Records that we have two hits that are riding for the No. 1 spots in all the charts."

TRADE MAGAZINE, January 1954:
....Joel Tunero's Sunday sessions over WNJR each week guests one of the big names in the business. One of Joel's most recent shows featured Chicago's own ace of the airwaves, Al Benson, who came in for a quick two-day visit to do recording and plug his latest Parrot label platters.... the Five Thrills unveiled their groovy rendition of "Feel So Good", which had the joint rockin' and reelin', and when things quieted down a wee bit, the smooth and soothing voices of the Pelicans gave out with the pretty sounds....

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "My Baby's Gone" - The Five Thrills - Parrot 796 - 1954.
2. "Feel So Good" - The Five Thrills - Parrot 796 - 1954.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Above: CLEVELAND CALL AND POST. Both clippings are from June 1951.

At Left: CLEVELAND CALL AND POST, October 1951.

Above: COURIER POST (Camden, NJ): June 30, 1951.





Above Left: NEW YORK AGE: July 7, 1951. (The Four Buddies' appearance at The Apollo in Harlem, New York City.)

Above Right: Label image for Savoy 817-A, both sides recorded on August 23, 1951. The record was released in September 1951.
More versions of "(It's No) Sin", by other artists, are included in the next section of this webpage.

Cash Box Review (9/15/51):

THE FOUR BUDDIES — Savoy 817.... Sin/Heart And Soul
The upper half is a tune that has broken the pop field with a bang and should do equally as well in rhythm and blues. The Four Buddies present this slow and beautiful ballad in a pleasing style. The bottom side is an oldie that always draws the coin. Each end is strong and ops oughta take advantage of it.
The Billboard Review (9/22/51):
THE FOUR BUDDIES — Savoy 817....
(It's No) Sin
(84) The Buddies sing up a storm on their hard-hitting coverage of the sleeper tune. The lead tenor's ebullient, sliding chanting is arresting. Side could click for r.&b.
Heart And Soul (80) Combo's basement voice bass leads on an attractive reading of the Frank Loesser-Johnny Mercer torcher.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 80-89 was considered "excellent".)

Above Left: TRADE MAGAZINE, September 1951.

Above Right: TRADE MAGAZINE, November 1951. The correct title of the song is "(It's No) Sin". Perhaps Herman Lubinsky, owner and president of Savoy Records, believed the record would get more attention if it was named just "Sin".

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "(It's No) Sin" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 817-A - 1951.
2. "Heart And Soul" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 817-B - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


(IT'S NO) SIN:

CASH BOX, October 6, 1951: "SIN" BREAKS WIDE OPEN THROUGHOUT NATION
NEW YORK—“Sin”, by the Four Aces featuring A1 Alberts, the sensational sleeper that came out of Philadelphia, has broken all over the country. Recorded on the Victoria label, this was the first disk made by that firm. The record is being distributed nationally by Palda Records.

Dave Miller of Palda has had to hire outside pressing plants to manufacture the records which are being ordered at such a rate that he is being swamped. His own pressing facilities are working to capacity making Dot and Sittin’ In records.

Jimmy Martin in Chicago has been ordering in the 10,000 figures and he insists they must be flown out. Cleveland is also demanding more disks. In Philadelphia the demand can’t be met. And only this week, Miller had to fly a load of disks up to Sam Clark of Music Suppliers of New England in Boston personally. Now the disk is beginning to make fast headway in New York.

Within three weeks of the tune’s original “pick” by The Cash Box, Bobby Mellin, its publisher, received the rack order.

The following records have already been made since the Victoria version: Billy Williams on MGM; Savannah Churchill on RCA Victor; Eddy Howard; Sammy Kaye on Columbia; Arthur Prysock and A1 Morgan for Decca; Arthur (Guitar) Smith on MGM; the Four Buddies on Savoy; The Four Knights on Capitol; and The Larks on Apollo.
(NOTE: Disco-File indicates there was no version of this song by The Larks.)

It’s reported that A1 Alberts and the Four Aces, who made the original recording are about to be signed by a major label.

Above Left: TRADE MAGAZINE, September 1951 (The original version).

Above Right: (IT'S NO) SIN SHEET MUSIC (as by The Four Aces).

THE BILLBOARD, December 22, 1951: (IT'S NO) SIN
By George Hoven and Chester Shull- Published by Algonquin (BMI)

RECORDS AVAILABLE: S. Churchill, V 20-4230; B. Colt, Decatur 1001; W. Davis, Prestige 911; Four Aces, Victoria 101; Four Buddies, Savoy 817; Four Knights, Cap 1806; C. Hawkins, Dec 27853; E. Howard, Mercury 5711; S. Kaye Col 39567; A. Morgan, Dec 27794; B. Peacock, King 4505; A Prysock, Dec 27769; T. Smith, United 107; B. Williams Quartet, MGM 11066.
ELECTRICAL TRANSCRIPTION LIBRARIES, Dean Hudson, Lang Worth; Glenn Osser Ork, Associated.
(NOTE: The Larks are not included in this later listing.)

Above Left: Photo of Arthur Prysock, circa 1951. Prysock had been the featured vocalist with the Buddy Johnson Orchestra, starting in 1944.

Above Right: Label image for Decca 27769, released in September 1951. A vocal quartet backs Prysock on this one.

The Billboard Review (9/15/51):

ARTHUR PRYSOCK — DECCA 27769....
(It's No) Sin
(80) Prysock does a commendable turn with the superior "sleeper" ballad in an arrangement patterned after the original Victoria etching. Should catch some of the action, particularly in R.&B. areas.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 80-89 was considered "excellent.")

The Cash Box Review (9/22/51):

ARTHUR PRYSOCK — DECCA 27769....
(It's No) Sin
A tune which has been breaking wide open on a tiny label now starts getting recorded on the major labels. Here is Arthur Prysock’s version with the Sy Oliver ork doing the backing. Prysock has a right voice for the tune and does a nice job.... Ops won’t go wrong here.


THE BILLBOARD — SEPTEMBER 15, 1951

Above Left: Photo of Savannah Churchill, circa 1951. [This photo provided by Paul Ressler.]

Above Right: Label image for RCA Victor 20-4280, released in September 1951.

THE BILLBOARD, April 2, 1949: Savannah Churchill Signs With Victor
NEW YORK, March 26—Chirp Savannah Churchill this week signed a term recording contract with the RCA Victor label. She formerly waxed with Manor Records, where she hit a couple of seasons ago with I Want To Be Loved. The thrush is skedded for an early recording date.

NEW YORK AGE, April 16, 1949: Impressive Victor Deal
Savannah Churchill, whose last half-dozen records for Manor have reached the hit parade lists, signed a long-term pact this week with the RCA Victor Corporation. The impressive deal gives the songstress the right to choose her own songs.

THE BILLBOARD, April 9, 1949: Savannah Is Still With Manor, It Seems
NEW YORK, April 2— Savannah Churchill will continue to record for Manor Records, according to the chirp's personal manager, Irving Berman. Berman, who is also president of the diskery, spiked previous reports that she had switched to Victor, stating that she was linked to Manor by an iron-clad, long-term pact.

THE BILLBOARD, August 18, 1951:
RCA Victor, continuing its effort to invigorate its rhythm and blues department, last week signed a batch of new talent. Most important acquisition in name power was veteran thrush Savannah Churchill, who had an important disking in "I Want To Be Loved" a couple of years ago and who last recorded for the Regal diskery....

The Billboard Review (9/22/51):

SAVANNAH CHURCHILL — VICTOR 20-4280....
(It's No) Sin
(80) Miss Churchill debuts on Victor with a very substantial coverage slicing of the "sleeper" ballad hit. She's ably supported by a fine quartet. Could do well in r.&b. quarters.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 80-89 was considered "excellent.")

The Cash Box Review (9/22/51):

SAVANNAH CHURCHILL — RCA VICTOR 20-4280; 47-4280....
(It's No) Sin
For her first effort on the Victor label Savannah Churchill takes the high flying "Sin" and does a real good job with it. Backed by a chorus, Savannah gets some good feeling into this.

At Left: Savannah Churchill in the RCA Victor recording studio. [This photo provided by Hans-Joachim Krohberger.]

Above: TRADE MAGAZINE, September 1951.


Above Left: Photo of The Four Knights (L-R) Clarence Dixon, baritone; Gene Alford, lead tenor and whistler extraordinaire; Oscar Broadway, bass; and John Wallace, second tenor and guitar. [This photo provided by Hans-Joachim Krohberger.]

Above Right: Label image for Capitol 1806 (Denmark), recorded on September 7, 1951. The record was released in the USA on October 1, 1951. It seems that foreign releases of USA record companies, as this Capitol one, had more interesting, elaborate, fancy label designs than the USA counterparts.

The Cash Box Review (9/29/51):

THE FOUR KNIGHTS — CAPITOL 1806....
(It's No) Sin
The Four Knights, who have been showing a great deal of promise with their initial disks, follow through with an interpretation which should enhance their reputation. It is the tune that everyone is recording and this version is bound to be up there with the rest of them.... Ops will do ok with this disk.

The Billboard Review (9/22/51):

THE FOUR KNIGHTS — CAPITOL 1806....
(It's No) Sin
(78) Another good go from the foursome on coverage of a fine sleeper hit ballad. It's a late entry but a good one.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 70-79 was considered "good.")

Above Left: JET MAGAZINE, November 15, 1951: TV'S MOST REGULAR FOURSOME
Under contract for 39 weeks on NBC's Saturday night hour-long "Show Of Shows", the Billy Williams Quartet holds the record for being the most regular Negro entertainment act in television. Organized only two years, the popular foursome appeared at New York's Paramount Theater last week. The group is set for dates in Washington and Buffalo and a swing West after Christmas which will take them to Las Vegas for two weeks.

Above Right: Label image for M-G-M 11066-A, recorded on September 6, 1951. The record was released in September 1951.

THE BILLBOARD, September 1951:
This town [Los Angeles] can show its appreciation of a fine thing musically at times, as it did in the case of Billy Willaims and his great quartet, which drew a run of full houses to the Tiffiny Club on 8th Street during a few weeks stay.

The Billboard Review (9/29/51):

BILLY WILLIAMS QUARTET — M-G-M 11066....
(It's No) Sin
(85) Williams leads the quartet thru an excellent coverage disking on the fast growing sleeper ballad. Should catch a sizable chunk.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 80-89 was considered "excellent.")

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "(It's No) Sin" - Arthur Prysock With Vocal Quartet - Decca 27769 - 1951.
2. "(It's No) Sin" - Savannah Churchill (And The Four Tunes) - RCA Victor 20-4280 - 1951.
3. "(It's No) Sin" - The Four Knights - Capitol 1806 - 1951.
4. "(It's No) Sin" - Billy Williams Quartet - M-G-M 11066-A - 1951.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


THE FOUR BUDDIES (CONTINUED):
Above Left: Label image for Savoy 823-B, recorded on August 23, 1951. The flip-side, "Window Eyes" was recorded on May 23, 1951. The record was released in December 1951.

Above Right: CLEVELAND CALL AND POST, April 1952.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Window Eyes" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 823-A - 1951.
2. "Simply Say Goodbye" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 823-B - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Above Left: Label images for Savoy 845-A/B, recorded on April 10, 1952. The record was released in May 1952. Leon Harrison, the group's lead tenor, is credited as composer on both sides.


THE CASH BOX REVIEW — MAY 10, 1952


TRADE MAGAZINE — MAY 1952

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "You're Part Of Me" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 845-A - 1952.
2. "Story Blues" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 845-B - 1952.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Above: Label images for Savoy 866-A, recorded on April 10, 1952 and Savoy 866-B, recorded on August 23, 1951. The record was released in October 1952. The "A" side is another Leon Harrison composition.


THE CASH BOX REVIEW — MAY 10, 1952

Click HERE for an article about The Four Buddies by Marv Goldberg. (Will open in a separate window)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "What's The Matter With Me?" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 866-A - 1952.
2. "Sweet Tooth For My Baby" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 866-B - 1952.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


LINDA HOPKINS:
Above: Two photos of Linda Hopkins. She was born in 1924 as Melinda Helen Matthews. At eleven years old and singing gospel, Mahalia Jackson discovered her. She later turned to jazz and blues music. In late 1950 she met Johnny Otis and Little Esther, who gave her the stage name of Linda Hopkins. From there, Herman Lubinsky signed her to a contract with Savoy Records.

CASH BOX, March 31, 1951:
Ran into Gordon Wolf, headman of Sunland Music, who had assistant manager Jimmy Berkemeyer and San Diego salesman Gordon Gray with him. Gordon (both of ’em) told us what a great find Herman Lubinsky has in his new Savoy label thrush, Linda Hopkins, the Little Esther replacement who sounds a little like Dinah Washington....

First out for her is “Living And Loving You” and “Doggin Blues”. Lubinsky, we also learned, has just signed another femme singer weighing 400 pounds and carrying the intriguingly descriptive title of “Fat Fanny".... (NOTE: No released record or even a recording session for Fat Fanny could be found.)

Above: Label images for Savoy 780-A/B, recorded on January 9, 1951. The record was released in February 1951. Linda Hopkins gets co-composer credit, with Johnny Otis, on the label for the "A" side.


TRADE MAGAZINE — SEPTEMBER 1951

The Cash Box Review (3/10/51):

JOHNNY OTIS ORCH. — SAVOY 780.... Living And Loving You/Doggin Blues
Johnny Otis and his orchestra turn out two winning sides here. Both ends are ballads with terrific vocals by Linda Hopkins who delivers in a sort of broken style. Johnny backs her up with some terrific instrumentals and the net result is some highly listenable music.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Doggin Blues" - Linda Hopkins - Savoy 780-A - 1951.
2. "Living And Loving You" - Linda Hopkins - Savoy 780-B - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


BILLY WRIGHT:
Above: Photo of Billy Wright, known as the "Prince of the Blues". In 1954, after his successful stint with Savoy Records, he moved to the Peacock label.
Above Left: Label image for Savoy 776-A, recorded on December 5, 1950 and released in December 1950.

Above Right: Label image for Savoy 781-A, recorded on December 5, 1950 and released in April 1951. The label gives Billy Wright credit for composing this song. "Stacked Deck" was also released on Savoy's subsidiary label, Regent 1033.


THE CASH BOX REVIEW — DECEMBER 30, 1950

Above Left: CASH BOX, March 31, 1951. (NOTE: "Doggin Blues" by Linda Hopkins is included further up on this webpage.)

Above Right: CASH BOX, April 21, 1951.

THE BILLBOARD, March 31, 1951: RCA PLANS NEW 45 R.&B. PITCH
NEW YORK—Herman Lubinsky, of Savoy Records, is needling RCA Victor about failure of the company to put across the 45 r.p.m. pitch in the rhythm and blues field with the same degree of success the company has spearheaded the 45 effort in the pop market.

Lubinsky received word from Joe Elliott, veepee in charge of consumer products for the RCA Victor division this week, in which Elliott said the company has been studying the r. and b. problem for the past six months and was ready to take action shortly.

THE BILLBOARD, May 12, 1951: POLLACK SELLS JEWEL WAXERY TO LUBINSKY
HOLLYWOOD—Herman Lubinsky, Savoy Records topper, Friday (4), bought out Jewel Records from orkster Benny Pollack for an undisclosed sum. Deal includes 150 masters, some of which are waxings of Kay Starr and Boyd Raeburn.

Transaction gives Lubinsky additional power for his rhythm and blues label, especially with the Kay Starr cuttings, where the gal sells equally as well in the white and r.&b. fields.

Pollack will serve as Lubinsky's artist–repertoire rep on the Coast and will also record a series of Dixieland sides for the label.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Keep Your Hands On Your Heart" - Billy Wright - Savoy 776-A - 1950.
2. "Stacked Deck" - Billy Wright - Savoy 781-A - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


LITTLE SYLVIA:
[The above photo provided by Paul Ressler.]
Above: Photo of Little Sylvia. Real name... Sylvia Vanderpool. In 1950, she recorded for the Columbia label with The Magichords backing her. She was the "Sylvia" in "Mickey And Sylvia" (with Mickey Baker), resulting in their number one rhythm and blues record "Love Is Strange" in 1957. As Sylvia Robinson, she was a co-founder of the hip-hop label "Sugar Hill" in 1979.

THE BILLBOARD, August 18, 1951:
Savoy also inked a new blues shouting thrush, Little Sylvia, who is being touted as the label's successor to Little Esther. The New Paterson, N.J. canary will record with the Heywood Henry band.... The same diskery will make some sides with a group known as the Cocoatones.
(NOTE: No released record or even a recording session for the Cocoatones could be found.)

THE BILLBOARD, August 25, 1951:
Leroy Kirkland this week was hired as staff arranger for the r.&b. department of Savoy Records. The diskery also signed Danny (Run Joe) Taylor, a blues shouter, to a term paper. Savoy is readying for release its first wax done with Little Sylvia. Lee Magid, Savoy recording exec, returned to New York this week after slicing new wax with blues singer Billy Wright in Atlanta. (NOTE: No released record or even a recording session for Danny Taylor could be found. There was a vocalist, Danny Cobb, who had Savoy recording sessions on July 25, 1951 and December 13, 1951, resulting in three records on the label.)

Above: Label images for Savoy 816-A/B, both sides recorded on August 10, 1951. The record was released in August 1951.


TRADE MAGAZINE — SEPTEMBER 1951

Above Left: THE CASH BOX REVIEW, September 8, 1951.

Above Right: Photo of Little Sylvia Vanderpool. That's the Buddy Johnson band behind her.


LITTLE SYLVIA—BONUS RECORD:
Above: Label images for Jubilee 5100. The record was released in October 1952.

At Left: CASH BOX, November 8, 1952.

Above: CASH BOX REVIEW: November 1, 1952.




The Billboard Review (11/15/52):

LITTLE SYLVIA — JUBILEE 5100....
A Million Tears
(75) The thrush has a powerful item here in this attractive new weeper ballad. Tune is pretty and the thrush hands it a good rendition, helped by smooth ork backing. Tune could stir action if exploited.
Don't Blame My Heart (70) Little Sylvia does a warm job with this ballad, but the flip carries all the excitement.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 70-79 was considered "good.")

At Left: TRADE MAGAZINE, December 1951.

NOTE: The two sides that were released on Columbia Records in 1950 by Sylvia Vanderpool And The Magichords are included in the following audio selections.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Chocolate Candy Blues" - Sylvia Vanderpool and The Magichords (Hot Lips Page Orch) - Columbia 30220 - 1950.
2. "I Was Under The Impression (That You Loved Me)" - Sylvia Vanderpool and The Magichords - Columbia 30227 - 1950.
3. "Little Boy" - Little Sylvia - Savoy 816-A - 1951.
4. "How Long Must I Be Blue" - Little Sylvia - Savoy 816-B - 1951.
5. "A Million Tears" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5100 - 1952.
6. "Don't Blame My Heart" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5100 - 1952.

ALL SIX SONGS played in sequence.



THE FALCONS:
Above: Label images for Regent 1041-A/B, both sides recorded on August 20,1951 and the record released in November 1951. Regent was a subsidiary label of Savoy Records. While the labels feature Goldie Boots only on the "A" side, she sings lead on both sides.

Co-composer "Clyde L. Otis" is "Clyde Lovern Otis", who co-wrote several BMI award winning songs, including some of Brook Benton's hits in the late 1950s. Earres Prince is the piano player in the combo backing The Falcons on this record.

Bert V. Palmer, composer of "I Can't Tell You Now", was a member of The Falcons on this record and also The Four Buddies at the same time. The other members of The Falcons consisted of Goldie "Boots" Alsup, Earl Alsup, and George Alsup (sister and brothers).

The Falcons had one other record, Savoy 893, released in April 1953, but recorded in the same August 20, 1951 session.

At Right: Photo of Bert V. Palmer.


TRADE MAGAZINE — OCTOBER 1951
The Billboard Review 12/1/51):
THE FALCONS — Regent 1041....
How Blind Can You Be
(72) Thrush pipes lead on likely ballad, with male group doing the harmony in back. She does fair, group backs smartly.
I Can't Tell You Now (72) Much like flip.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 70-79 was considered "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "How Blind Can You Be" - The Falcons Featuring Goldie Boots - Regent 1041-A - 1951.
2. "I Can't Tell You Now" - The Falcons - Regent 1041-B - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


MEL WALKER:  (NOTE: CHECK OUT SAVOY RECORDS - PART TWO FOR MORE MEL WALKER.)
Above: Label images for Savoy 821-A, recorded on August 12, 1950, and Savoy 821-B, recorded on January 5, 1951. The record was released in October 1951.

Above Left: CASH BOX, November 17, 1951.

Above Right: Photo of Johnny Otis, Little Esther, and Mel Walker. Walker was a featured vocalist with the Johnny Otis Orchestra from 1949 to 1953. His 1950 Savoy record with Johnny Otis, "Rockin' Blues" was a big hit on the rhythm and blues charts.

The Billboard Review 11/3/51):

MEL WALKER & JOHNNY OTIS ORCH.— Savoy 821.... Sunset To Dawn/Feel Like Cryin' Again
An appealing blues item is sent on its way through the combined efforts of Mel Walker, handling vocal, and Johnny Otis and his crew, who supply the musical setting. Again on the second end the boys collaborate in bringing home a grand jump tune. Ops have strong numbers on either lid.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Sunset To Dawn" - Mel Walker - Savoy 821-A - 1951.
2. "Feel Like Cryin' Again" - Mel Walker - Savoy 821-B - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


NOTE: Most discographical information provided at this website is from Ferdie Gonzalez' Disco-File.


SAVOY RECORDS - PART ONE FEATURES THE SAVOY DICTATORS, BONNIE DAVIS AND THE BUNNY BANKS TRIO, THE JOHNSON JUBILEE SINGERS, MISS RHAPSODY, THE TOPPERS, AND INDECENT SAVOY RECORDS.

SAVOY RECORDS - PART TWO FEATURES THE KING COLE TRIO, TINY BRADSHAW ORCHESTRA, THE X-RAYS, THE ROBINS, THREE B'S AND A HONEY, LITTLE ESTHER, MEL WALKER, JOHNNY OTIS ORCHESTRA, LIL GREEN, AND THE RAY-O-VACS.


Listen to this week's selections using Windows Media Player:
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

          1. "I Will Wait" - The Four Buds - Savoy 769-A - 1951.
          2. "Just To See You Smile Again" - The Four Buds - Savoy 769-B - 1951.
          3. "Sweet Slumber" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 779-A - 1951.
          4. "Sweet Slumber" - The Scamps - Modern Music 20-521B - 1947.
          5. "Don't Leave Me Now" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 779-B - 1951.
          6. "My Summer's Gone" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 789-A - 1951.
          7. "Why, At A Time Like This" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 789-B - 1951.
          8. "My Baby's Gone" - The Five Thrills - Parrot 796 - 1954.
          9. "Feel So Good" - The Five Thrills - Parrot 796 - 1954.
        10. "(It's No) Sin" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 817-A - 1951.
        11. "Heart And Soul" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 817-B - 1951.
        12. "(It's No) Sin" - Arthur Prysock With Vocal Quartet - Decca 27769 - 1951.
        13. "(It's No) Sin" - Savannah Churchill (And The Four Tunes) - RCA Victor 20-4280 - 1951.
        14. "(It's No) Sin" - The Four Knights - Capitol 1806 - 1951.
        15. "(It's No) Sin" - Billy Williams Quartet - M-G-M 11066-A - 1951.
        16. "Window Eyes" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 823-A - 1951.
        17. "Simply Say Goodbye" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 823-B - 1951.
        18. "You're Part Of Me" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 845-A - 1952.
        19. "Story Blues" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 845-B - 1952.
        20. "What's The Matter With Me?" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 866-A - 1952.
        21. "Sweet Tooth For My Baby" - The Four Buddies - Savoy 866-B - 1952.
        22. "Doggin Blues" - Linda Hopkins - Savoy 780-A - 1951.
        23. "Living And Loving You" - Linda Hopkins - Savoy 780-B - 1951.
        24. "Keep Your Hands On Your Heart" - Billy Wright - Savoy 776-A - 1950.
        25. "Stacked Deck" - Billy Wright - Savoy 781-A - 1951.
        26. "Chocolate Candy Blues" - Sylvia Vanderpool and The Magichords (Hot Lips Page Orch) - Columbia 30220 - 1950.
        27. "I Was Under The Impression (That You Loved Me)" - Sylvia Vanderpool and The Magichords - Columbia 30227 - 1950.
        28. "Little Boy" - Little Sylvia - Savoy 816-A - 1951.
        29. "How Long Must I Be Blue" - Little Sylvia - Savoy 816-B - 1951.
        30. "A Million Tears" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5100 - 1952.
        31. "Don't Blame My Heart" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5100 - 1952.
        32. "How Blind Can You Be" - The Falcons Featuring Goldie Boots - Regent 1041-A - 1951.
        33. "I Can't Tell You Now" - The Falcons - Regent 1041-B - 1951.
        34. "Sunset To Dawn" - Mel Walker - Savoy 821-A - 1951.
        35. "Feel Like Cryin' Again" - Mel Walker - Savoy 821-B - 1951.
 
          ALL THIRTY-FIVE ABOVE SONGS played in sequence.
 
          ALL FOURTEEN ABOVE SONGS BY THE FOUR BUDDIES played in sequence.


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