#950 (7/31/21)

SPOTLIGHT ON SAVOY RECORDS - PART ONE (1942-1946)

"Rhythm & Bugs"
by Savoy Dictators
on Savoy 100-A
released 1942

"Don't Stop Now"/
"Moon Nocturne"
by Bonnie Davis
With The Bunny Banks Trio
on Savoy 102-A, released 1943

"Why Don't You Do Right"/
"He Knows How To Knock Me Out"
by Bunny Banks Trio
Vocal by Bonnie Davis
on Savoy 104-A/B, released 1943

"No Love Blues"
by Bonnie Davis
With The Bunny Banks Trio
on Savoy 110-B
released 1943

"Get In Touch With Me"
by Bonnie Davis
With The Bunny Banks Trio
on Savoy 112-A
released 1943

"Rock My Soul"
by The Johnson Jubilee Singers
on King Solomon 1002-A
released in 1943

"Sweet Man"/
"Down Hearted Blues"
by Miss Rhapsody
on Savoy 534-A/B
released in 1945

"If Money Grew On Trees"/
"Palace Of Stone"
by The Toppers
on Savoy 559-A/B
released in 194

"The Chair Song"
by Billy Moore
And His Jumpin String Octette
on Savoy 562-A
released in 1945

"Upstairs"
by Piccadilly-Pipers
Vocal by Bonnie Davis
on Savoy 5517-A/B
released in 1945

"Let Me Play With Your Poodle"
by The Piccadilly Pipers
Vocal by Bonnie Davis
on Savoy 5525-A
released in 1946

"Weddin-Day Blues"
by Cousin Joe
on Savoy 5527-A
released in 1946

Includes Audio For Eighteen Songs
(Audio Restored By Dave Saviet - Images Restored By Tony Fournier)



Above: Photo of a young Herman Lubinsky, who was a Newark, NJ, musical entrepreneur and businessman.

In 1933, he started the United Radio Company, which sold and repaired radios and phonographs. This evolved into selling records and his Radio Record Shop. In 1942, he launched Savoy Record Company with the release of two records by a Newark jazz band of black musicians that he had recorded years earlier.

Savoy's third release became a sizable hit which gave the label the boost it needed for expansion. The artists on this record were a Newark group, The Piccadilly Pipers under the pseudonym "Bunny Banks Trio" with Bonnie Davis.

The BILLBOARD 1943 YEAR BOOK:

SAVOY RECORD COMPANY

HOME OFFICE:

Savoy Record Company
58 Market Street
Newark, N.J.

HOME OFFICE EXECUTIVES:

Herman Lubinsky, President and Treasurer
Charles Manz, Vice-President and Secretary
Henry Allen, Sales Manager

SAVOY LABEL'S FIRST RECORD:
Above: THE BILLBOARD, November 28, 1942.
(NOTE: Lubinsky invested in Billboard advertising heavily pretty much thoughout Savoy's existance and especially at the start of his fledgling label.)

THE BILLBOARD, November 14, 1942:
Savoy Records Company, Newark, N.J., entered the field last week, reporting that it had five records ready for release. Announcement says its records are not made of "pre-war materials". (NOTE: The early Savoy records were thicker and heavier than the usual 78-rpm records of the time.)

Above: Label image for Savoy 100-A, recorded in 1939 and released in November 1942. It is Savoy's first record. The second release on Savoy was also by The Savoy Dictators from the same session. Note that the band members include Clem Moorman (piano) who would later be part of The Bunny Banks Trio and Piccadilly Pipers.

The Savoy Dictators played regularly at Newark's Savoy Ballroom, hence the first part of their name. Savoy Records came about years later. It is possible that Savoy Records was also named after the Savoy Ballroom.

The Billboard Review (12-12-42):

SAVOY DICTATORS — Savoy 100-A.... "Rhythm And Bugs"
Savoy contributes to the pleasure of the young jitterbugging public with two hot items by the Savoy Dictators. Altho "Dictators" is a studio group, men and their instruments are listed on the face of the disk, and for the most part they rate it.

Rhythm and Bugs is a fast stomper with melody patterned in the shape of a swing bumblebee, a pleasant conceit. Saxes carry the idea forward in the first chorus, with trumpets stabbing sharply. A pleasant change of pace starts the second chorus off in half time, with trombone carrying the lead until the piano picks the tune up and puts it back into tempo. From then on, it is variations on theme, in ensemble for the most part, with snatches of solo bits.

The boys show that, if they are a pick-up crew, they sure learned in a hurry how to work as a unit. Jumper is flashy in execution rather than in arrangement. Tune is an original by boys in the band, sax men Count Hastings and Bobby Plater.

This is strictly for locations where the kids like to step between cokes. Disk will probably fare best in race areas.

(NOTE: The Savoy Dictators were not a studio band. Perhaps the reviewer mistook the "Savoy" in their name.)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
"Rhythm & Bugs" - Savoy Dictators - Savoy 100-A - 1942.


BUNNY BANKS TRIO WITH BONNIE DAVIS:

Above: THE BILLBOARD, February 27, 1943.

At Left: THE BILLBOARD, June 26, 1943.







Above Top: THE BILLBOARD, April 3, 1943.

Above Bottom: THE BILLBOARD, April 24, 1943.

THE BILLBOARD, December 12, 1942: SAVOY DISKS
Savoy Record Company, Newark, N.J., formed a few months back, has come up with two more pop releases. Jazz instrumentals [sic] by the Buddy Banks Trio [sic], they are Moonlight Nocturne backed by I Can't Get Started and Don't Stop Now mated with That Ain't Right [sic]. Firm claims that it can ship goods to any and all dealers, a spokesman declaring that enough scrap reserves are on hand to maintain production for some time to come.

(NOTE: The above article has several errors. "Buddy Banks Trio" is actually "Bunny Banks Trio" or "Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio". Savoy 103 "I Can't Get Started" was backed with "That Ain't Right". Savoy 102 "Don't Stop Now" was mated with "Moonlight Nocturne". It was also released mated with "Paratroop Boogie", and later, "He Knows How To Knock Me Out". Both "Don't Stop Now" and "Moonlight Nocturne" are vocals by Bonnie Davis.)


[The above photo provided by Paul Ressler.]
Above: The Piccadilly Pipers (Clockwise From Top) Bonnie Davis, Ernie Ransome, Clem Moorman, and Henry "Pat" Padgette.
Above: Label image for Savoy 102-A, recorded in 1942 and released in January 1943.

Bonnie Davis with The Bunny Banks Trio is a pseudonym for The Piccadilly Pipers, who had found success at The Piccadilly Club in Newark, NJ. At this time, the group consisted of Clem Moorman (piano), Ernie Ransome (guitar), Henry Padgette (bass), and Bonnie Davis (vocals). Bonnie's real name is Melba Smith.

THE BILLBOARD, March 6, 1943:
....Savoy Record Company is so occupied with filling orders on "Don't Stop Now" that it's dropped all work on other releases. Firm even received a large order from Hawaii for the tune....

The Billboard Review (1-30-43):

BUNNY BANKS TRIO — Savoy 102.... "Don't Stop Now"/"Moon Nocturne"
The Petrillo-enforced hiatus in the recording industry has provided an open door for many of the lesser known labels to come to light. Latest one to seek a place in the record marts is the Savoy label, offered up by the Savoy Record Company, of Newark, N.J. Label's connotation undoubtedly stems from the famous Savoy Ballroom up New York's Harlem way.

From these two sides and the titles of the forthcoming issues, the firm's waxes are dedicated to the Harlem brand of hot. For these sides it's a cocktail combo in the Bunny Banks Trio of piano, bass, and guitar. However, it is the blues singing of Bonnie Davis that monopolizes the attention of the sides. Gal has a good blues voice and no doubt can sing them, too. Unfortunately. she isn't given the opportunity here. Moreover, poor mechanical reproduction, especially marked in the piano playing, detracts much from both vocal and instrumental efforts.

Best side is Don't Stop Now, one of those modest hesitation jump ditties with the exhortation not to stop making with the love business. Taking it at a moderately slow tempo, gal gives out on the opening stanza. Guitar pickings and piano fingerings start a second stanza, and Miss Bonnie is brought back at the bridge to sing it out. Moon Nocturne is a slow mood ballad that might show strong commercial appeal under more favorable circumstances.

Gal is not a pop singer and she tries mighty hard to sound like Billie Holiday. Weighted down by song material out of her register and poor reproduction, the side just ain't.

Don't Stop Now, with its infectious jump character, should hold some appeal to the phono fans, especially at the race locations.

CALIFORNIA EAGLE, March 17, 1943: BONNIE DAVIS WINS BILLBOARD HIT POPULARITY POLL
Bonnie Davis, sophisticated Lady of Rhythm, has rocked the nation with her new song rendition of the tune "Don't Stop Now", which is selling faster than they can be made. Miss Davis' record was fourth place on the Harlem Hit Parade three weeks ago. In the last two weeks it has jumped to first place, winning the Harlem Hit Parade two weeks in a row....

DAILY NEWS, March 21, 1943:
....Another new label, Savoy, concentrating on colored entertainers, gets under way with a pretty good item featuring an insinuating voice identified as Bonnie Davis. Bunny Banks Trio furnishes the instrumental background....

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, June 25, 1943:
Lou's Chancellor Bar, 1427 Chancellor Street, is featuring the torrid Piccadilly Pipers, with Bonnie Davis, of radio and recording fame.... the spot is cool and comfortable.

THE BILLBOARD, July 17, 1943: THE PICCADILLY PIPERS WITH BONNIE DAVIS AT LOU'S CHANCELLOR BAR, PHILADELPHIA
There is a load of tuneful and rhythmic appeal packed into these Pipers, plus a world of personality and showmanship that makes this sepia trio a standout in such circles. Moreover, the three lads have the added advantage of Bonnie Davis, pert and winsome miss, to handle the featured vocals.

Gal made a big impression in the wax circles with her Savoy recording of Don't Stop Now, made with the Pipers when they were known as the Bunny Banks Trio. It is Ernie Ransome, guitarist, leader of the unit; Clem Moorman on piano; and Henry Padgette on bass. A little girl with a big voice, Miss Davis is an attention-getter for both the pops and blues.

The three males give the gal heavy instrumental support. And on their own, cut it up expertly for the rhythm and jive ditties. Also get over a goodly number of novelty numbers, high in entertainment content, particularly the bit where they take the piano apart. (Wish I could have seen that!)

Entire unit makes a swell appearance and everything they offer is highly polished. Have been holding forth since the start of the year and set to finish out the twelve months.

Above Left: PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, April 29, 1943.

Above Right: PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, July 27, 1943.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Don't Stop Now" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 102-A - 1943.
2. "Moon Nocturne" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 102-B - 1943.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


LET'S NOT STOP NOW:
Above Left: Label image for Beacon 111-A released in 1943. This was an attempt by Joe Davis (Beacon Records owner) to cash in on the recent popularity of Bonnie Davis' "Don't Stop Now".

Above Right: Label image for Decca 7864 A released in 1941. Here's the same song by Yack Taylor from two years earlier. And perhaps her's is the best version of the three here. Co-composer shown on the label, J. Mayo Williams, was head of the "race records" department at Decca Records.

At Left: THE BILLBOARD, May 8, 1943.

The Billboard Review (4-17-43):

BEVERLY WHITE (Blues Chasers) — Beacon 111.... "Don't Stop Now"
This rhythm ditty, hot from Harlem, is a definite sleeper. It has already shown its first signs of strength following its introduction by Bonnie Davis on the Savoy record label, enjoying boom sales. With Beverly White now making the most of the lyrical innuendos with her blues-shouting style of singing, there should be no stopping the song in phono circles since the appeal of the ditty has gotten beyond the race locations.

Altho a new name for the records, and this name particularly, Beverly White may be remembered as the former vocalist for Claude Hopkins's band of a half dozen years ago. Gets adequate instrumental support on the side from her Blues Chasers, taking in a piano, guitar and bass.

The Billboard Review (4-17-43):

BEVERLY WHITE — Beacon 111.... "Don't Stop Now"
Originally introduced on the waxes under the Savoy label, featuring the singing of Bonnie Davis, the disk has been selling well. The tune, by William Campbell, was published a few weeks ago when Joe Davis, head of the Beacon record firm, took the song for his music house. In bringing it out on his own label, Davis introduces a new voice to his growing list of Beacon artists.

Beverly White, sepia songbird devoted to the sultry and blues-shouting style of singing, is remembered as the canary with Claude Hopkins's band a half dozen years ago. With a blues flavoring that is typically a Harlem brand, Miss White is at home in bringing out all the innuendos of this bright rhythmic ditty. Hits into it from start with a bright tempo set by her accompanying Blues Chasers, comprising piano, guitar, and bass. The Chasers get the second stanza under way, with Miss Beverly bringing it up again at the bridge to finish out the side.

"Don't Stop Now" has already proved a sleeper. And now with Beverly White's entrance into the field, music ops have another forceful entry to realize the most of this rhythmical hit.

(NOTE: Yes, there were two reviews for this record in the same edition of The Billboard.)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Don't Stop Now!" - Beverly White - Beacon 111-A - 1943.
2. "Don't Stop Now" - Yack Taylor - Decca 7864 A - 1941.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


MORE BONNIE AND BUNNY:
Above Left: Label image for Savoy 104-B, recorded in 1942 and released in 1943.

Above Right: Label image for Savoy 110-B, recorded in 1942 and released in 1943.

At Direct Left: Label image for Savoy 112-A, recorded in 1942 and released in 1943.

Personnel on all three of these records are Bonnie Davis (vocals), Clem Moorman (piano),
Ernie Ransome (guitar), and Henry Padgette (bass).

Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio had a total of seven records (plus a few reissues) released on the Savoy label, all from 1942 to 1943.

Bonnie Davis And The Piccadilly Pipers had an additional three records issued on Savoy in 1945-1946, plus some reissues.




LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Why Don't You Do Right" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 104-A - 1943.
2. "He Knows How To Knock Me Out" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 104-B - 1943.
3. "No Love Blues" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 110-B - 1943.
4. "Get In Touch With Me" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 112-A - 1943.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.



Above: THE BILLBOARD, January 29, 1944.

THE KING SOLOMON LABEL:

At Left: Label image for King Solomon 1002-A, "Rock My Soul", Johnson Jubilee Singers, recorded in 1943 and released that same year.

Savoy Records started their subsidiary gospel label, King Solomon, in 1943. There were only twenty-two releases on the label before it shut down in 1948. The first thirteen records, all released in 1943 and 1944, were by "Kings Of Harmony Quartette", "Original Kings Of Harmony" [same group, but name changed?], and Johnson Jubilee Singers".

The songs were sung a cappella, which worked out well during the "Petrillo Ban" musicians' strike (1942-1944).

THE BILLBOARD, June 5, 1943: NEW DISK ON MARKET
NEW YORK—Savoy Record Company, Newark, N.J., is bringing out a new label to be called King Solomon records. Waxings under the new label will be exclusively devoted to Negro spirituals, and the first release is due within the next few weeks.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
"Rock My Soul" - Johnson Jubilee Singers - King Solomon 1002-A - 1943.



MISS RHAPSODY (VIOLA WELLS):
Above: Herman Lubinsky (smoking cigar) with Miss Rhapsody.

This photo is from a May 15, 1945 recording session. (L-R) Freddie Webster (trumpet), Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis (saxophone), Herman Lubinsky, Cozy Cole (drums), Miss Rhapsody (Viola Wells), Harold Underwood (guitar), Billy Taylor (bass), and Reuben "June" Cole (piano). Cozy and June were brothers. Viola Wells was marrried to Harold Underwood.

Above Left: Miss Rhapsody (Viola Wells), circa 1944. Her real name: Viola Wells. Born in Newark, NJ, she was a blues singer, who, around the time of her Savoy recordings, was performing regularly at Kelly's Stable in New York City (1940-1944) and Club Bali in Washington, D.C. (1943-1946).

Above Right: Label image for Savoy 534-A, recorded on November 21, 1944 and released in early 1945. Harold Underhill, shown on the label as guitarist, was Miss Rhapsody's husband. "Miss Rhapsody" had five records released on the Savoy label (1944-1945), plus one more under her name "Viola Wells" (1945).


Above: THE BILLBOARD, December 23, 1944.
(NOTE: The sides mentioned are Miss Rhapsody's first two Savoy records, Savoy 5510 and 5511, except the fourth song is "Bye Bye Baby". "Sugar" was released at a later date.)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Sweet Man" - Miss Rhapsody - Savoy 534-A - 1945.
2. "Down Hearted Blues" - Miss Rhapsody - Savoy 534-B - 1945.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


THE TOPPERS:
Above Left And Right: Label images for Savoy 559-A/B, recorded on December 8, 1944 and released in 1945. This was "The Toppers" only recording session for Savoy. The personnel on these sides are as shown on the record labels (albeit some misspellings). There is little doubt that the "Mr. Savoy" in "If Money Grew On Trees"' talking part is a reference to Herman Lubinsky.

"Palace Of Stone" was reissued on Savoy 656, renamed "I'm All Alone" and backed with "I'm Living For You", in 1947. Two records by them were released on Savoy's subsidiary label, Regent, in 1948 and 1949, both reissuing "I'm Living For You". In Savoy's early years, it was common to reissue sides, usually in a different pairing of songs.

[The above photos provided by Paul Ressler.]
Above Left: The Five Red Caps (L-R) David Patillo (bass), Jimmy Springs (vocals), Emmett Mathews (soprano sax), Romaine Brown (piano), and Steve Gibson (guitar). The Toppers on Savoy 559 consisted of this line-up.

It is likely that The Five Red Caps used the pseudonym "Toppers" because they were under contract to Joe Davis, owner of Beacon Records, at the time of these recordings. Gibson, Springs, and Patillo had previously been members of "The Four Toppers".

Above Right: Another The Five Red Caps photo, this time (L-R) David Patillo, Jimmy Springs (at bottom), Emmett Mathews, Romaine Brown, and Steve Gibson (with guitar).

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "If Money Grew On Trees" - The Toppers - Savoy 559-A - 1945.
2. "Palace Of Stone" - The Toppers - Savoy 559-B - 1945.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


"INDECENT" SAVOY RECORDS:
DAILY NEWS, November 24, 1942. INDECENT RECORDS BRING $800 FINES
Four Newark radio and music store proprietors who pleaded guilty to possession of indecent phonograph records, yesterday were fined a total of $800 by Police Judge Ernest Masini in Newark.

They are Herman Lubinsky, Thomas P. Ragyris, Aaron Lippman, and Jack H. Seaber.

HAWAII TRIBUNE HERALD, December 2, 1942.
NEW YORK—New Jersey Judge Masini fined Herman Lubinsky, Thomas P. Ragyris, Aaron Lippman, and Jack Sedar $200 each for possessing "outrageous and indecent" phonograph records.

Harry Kahan of the New York Society for the suppression of vice filed the complaint. Kahan saw advertisements announcing the Newark sale of these records, investigated, and worked with police assembling the evidence.

Masini ordered police to look out for further possession or sale of such records and to arrest persons involved. Masini said, "If they're convicted, I won't fine them. I'll jail them".

AND A FEW YEARS LATER, LUBINSKY IS PRODUCING SUCH RECORDS ON HIS SAVOY LABEL....

Above Left: Label image for Savoy 562-A, recorded on April 20, 1945 and released in 1945. His Jumping String Octette provides vocal backing to Billy Moore's singing. Billy Moore And His Jumping String Octette had two records, released consecutively, on the Savoy label in 1945. However, he did other work for the label as a guitarist in 1944-1945. [This record provided by Dave Saviet for use here.]

Above Right: Label image for Savoy 5527-A, recorded on January 13, 1946 and released in early 1946. Co-composer and "Direction" stated on the label is Teddy Reig, A&R man for Savoy Records. Cousin Joe had two records on the Savoy label, issued consecutively, in 1946.

Savoy did not name the musicians on the label for this record, so here they are: Leonard Hawkins, trumpet; Pete Brown, alto sax; Ray Abrams, tenor sax; Kenny Watts, piano; Jimmy Shirley, guitar; Leonard Gaskin, bass; Arthur Herbert, drums; and Cousin Joe, vocals.

Above Left: THE BILLBOARD, September 21, 1946. Actually, the label credits the backing band as "Pete Brown's Brooklyn Blue Blowers".

Above Right: Cousin Joe, real name Joseph Pleasant, was from New Orleans. He was a blues singer and played piano/guitar/ukulele. Most well known as "Cousin Joe", he was also referred to as "Smiling Joe" and "Pleasant Joe/Joseph".

[The above photo provided by Paul Ressler.]
Above: The Piccadilly Pipers (L-R) Ed "Skeets" McKaine (bass), Bonnie Davis (vocals), Ernie Ransome (guitar), and Clem Moorman (piano). Yes, even Bonnie And The Pipers went the double-entendre route on some of their records!
Above Left: Label image for Savoy 5517-A, recorded on December 10, 1945 and released in 1946.

Above Right: Label image for Savoy 5525-A, also recorded on December 10, 1945 and released in 1946.

The personnel for both of these records is the same as shown in the photo of The Piccadilly Pipers just above the label images.

Click HERE for more about The Piccadilly Pipers by Marv Goldberg. (Will open in a separate window)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "The Chair Song" - Billy Moore And His Jumpin String Octette - Savoy 562-A - 1945.
2. "Weddin-Day Blues" - Cousin Joe - Savoy 5527-A - 1946.
3. "Upstairs" - The Piccadilly-Pipers - Savoy 5517-A - 1946.
4. "Let Me Play With Your Poodle" - The Piccadilly Pipers With Bonnie Davis - Savoy 5525-A - 1946.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


NOTE: Most discographical information provided at this website is from Ferdie Gonzalez' Disco-File.


SAVOY RECORDS - PART TWO FEATURES KING COLE TRIO, TINY BRADSHAW ORCHESTRA, THE X-RAYS, THREE B'S AND A HONEY, THE ROBINS, LITTLE ESTHER, MEL WALKER, JOHNNY OTIS ORCHESTRA, AND THE RAY-O-VACS.

Listen to this week's selections using Windows Media Player:
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

          1. "Rhythm & Bugs" - Savoy Dictators - Savoy 100-A - 1942.
          2. "Don't Stop Now" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 102-A - 1943.
          3. "Moon Nocturne" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 102-B - 1943.
          4. "Don't Stop Now!" - Beverly White - Beacon 111-A - 1943.
          5. "Don't Stop Now" - Yack Taylor - Decca 7864 A - 1941.
          6. "Why Don't You Do Right" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 104-A - 1943.
          7. "He Knows How To Knock Me Out" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 104-B - 1943.
          8. "No Love Blues" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 110-B - 1943.
          9. "Get In Touch With Me" - Bonnie Davis With The Bunny Banks Trio - Savoy 112-A - 1943.
        10. "Rock My Soul" - Johnson Jubilee Singers - King Solomon 1002-A - 1943.
        11. "Sweet Man" - Miss Rhapsody - Savoy 534-A - 1945.
        12. "Down Hearted Blues" - Miss Rhapsody - Savoy 534-B - 1945.
        13. "If Money Grew On Trees" - The Toppers - Savoy 559-A - 1945.
        14. "Palace Of Stone" - The Toppers - Savoy 559-B - 1945.
        15. "The Chair Song" - Billy Moore And His Jumpin String Octette - Savoy 562-A - 1945.
        16. "Weddin-Day Blues" - Cousin Joe - Savoy 5527-A - 1946.
        17. "Upstairs" - The Piccadilly-Pipers - Savoy 5517-A - 1946.
        18. "Let Me Play With Your Poodle" - The Piccadilly Pipers With Bonnie Davis - Savoy 5525-A - 1946.
 
          ALL EIGHTEEN ABOVE SONGS played in sequence.
 


           [To download audio files, right-click on song title link and then select "Save link (target) as..."]


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