#944 (1/11/23)

MODERN RECORDS - PART EIGHT (1952-1958)

THIS ARTICLE IS IN MEMORY OF DAVID SAVIET WHO LEFT US ON OCTOBER 22, 2022.

DAVE CONTRIBUTED TO THIS WEBSITE FOR OVER SIXTEEN YEARS. HE MASTERFULLY RESTORED ALL THE 78-RPM RECORDS' AUDIO, MAKING THEM SOUND GREAT!


PART EIGHT concludes Modern Records' subsidiary label, FLAIR RECORDS, and features another of their subsidiary labels, CROWN RECORDS.

There are also sections on METEOR RECORDS and KENT RECORDS.

Artists include Richard Berry, The Dreamers, The Rams, The Drifters (Crown), Willard McDaniel, The Original Jubalaires, Kay Brown, Elmore James, J. T. (Big Boy) Brown, and B. B. King.

Highlighted are the songs "I've Waited All My Life For You", "You Won't Let Me Go", "Your Feet's Too Big", and "Love Me".




          FLAIR RECORDS - CONCLUSION                
(Previous coverage of the Flair label is in the "Modern Records - Part Seven" article.)                           

RICHARD BERRY — THE DREAMERS
Above: Photo of Richard Berry.
Above: Label images for both sides of Flair 1052, released in September 1954. The Dreamers, featuring Richard Berry, had three releases on the Flair label (1954-55).

Richard Berry had other releases on Flair as a single artist and with The Flairs (1953-55), The Hunters (1953), The Crowns (1954), The Chimes (1954), The Rams (1955), and The Cadets (1955). He also had releases as "Richard Berry And The Pharaohs" on Flip Records (1956-60).

Disco-File has the Flair Dreamers group as Richard Berry, Fanita Barrett, Jewell Cobbs, Patricia Howard, Gloria Jones, Annette Williams, and Nannette Williams.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "At Last" - The Dreamers Featuring Richard Berry - Flair 1052 - 1954.
2. "Bye Bye" - The Dreamers Featuring Richard Berry - Flair 1052 - 1954.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

CASH BOX, September 11. 1954:
....The Dreamers, a new group on the Flair label, have a solid deck with their latest waxing of "Bye Bye". Richard Berry, formerly with The Flairs, is featured as lead vocalist along with a group of five teen-age girls. The tune has broken wide open in LA....

The Billboard Review (9/18/54):

THE DREAMERS — Flair 1052
Bye, Bye
(79) Familiar buck dance riff is fashioned into a strong rhythm opus which is chanted powerfully by the group. There are smiles in this one. Should garner spins and many juke plays.
At Last (78) The beautiful old standard is sung tenderly by the group, with the bass lead adding listenable values.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)



EXTRA RECORDS — THE DREAMERS AND THE ROLLETTES

Above Left: Photo of The Dreamers. Clockwise from lower left: Nannette Williams, Fanita Barrett, Gloria Jones, and Annette Williams.

Also, there was a "Rollettes" group that recorded for Class (1956) with Fanita Barrett, Gloria Jones, and Annette Williams. And The Blossoms on Capitol (1957-58) with Fanita Barrett, Gloria Jones, Annette Williams, and Nannette Williams.

And let's not leave out a "Playgirls" group that recorded for RCA Victor (1959-60) with Fanita Barrett, Gloria Jones, and Nannette Jackson as members and also included Darlene Wright (aka Darlene Love).

Above Right: THE BILLBOARD, May 20, 1957:

Above: Label images for both sides of Flip 319, released in February 1957. Flip 319 was re-issued in 1961 as "Jenell Hawkins And The Dreamers" (Flip 354). Was Jenell another member of The Dreamers? Jenell Hawkins was with The Combo-Nets for one release on the Combo label in February 1956. [The above record provided by Andrew Bohan.]

As shown on the labels, both songs were composed by Richard Berry.

Although the general design and colors of the Flip label are similar to the Aladdin Records label, there does not seem to be any connection between the two Los Angeles record companies.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Since You've Been Gone" - The Dreamers - Flip 319 - 1957.
2. "Do Not Forget" - The Dreamers - Flip 319 - 1957.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

CASH BOX, March 23, 1957:
....Flip Records have signed a new four-girl vocal group called The Dreamers. Groupís first sides of "Since Youíve Been Gone" and "Do Not Forget" have been set for an early release....

The Billboard Review (4/20/57):

THE DREAMERS — Flip 319
Since You've Been Gone
(72) One of the wailingest chicks around leads the gal group thru this slow, insistent triplet-backed ballad. Strong pleasing quality in evidence. Jocks may expose this crew.
Do Not Forget (65) A slow, slow ballad with a dedicated feeling. Gal group is sometimes flat and always fervent on this wailer. With a little work this could be a strong group.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 60-69 considered as "satisfactory" and 70-79 as "good.")

Cash Box Review (4-13-57):

THE DREAMERS — Flip 319
Do Not Forget (B)
The Dreamers glide expertly through a slow beat pretty. The fem teamwork results in good sound and fine listening. Pleasing deck.
Since You've Been Gone (B) Another lilter given a smooth reading. Rhythmic romancer fashioned prettily.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good".)

CASH BOX, August 25, 1956: RENE SETS UP CLASS DISKERY
HOLLYWOOD -- Leon Rene, formerly president of the now defunct Exclusive Records label, returned to the disk business last week with the formation of a new company, Class Records. Rene, head of one of the most widely successful independent firms some years ago, declared the new firm will specialize in rhythm and blues.

A number of prominent r.&b. artists are currently being considered, with the Rollettes and Googie Rene already signed. Parker Prescott, who helmed the Exclusive operation in New York some years ago, will again function in a similar capacity. Distributors currently are being set up thruout the country....

Above Left: Label image for Class 201, released in July 1956. Flip-side is an instrumental, "Wham Bam", by Googie Rene And His Wham Bams.

Above Right: Photo of The Rollettes, (L-R) Fanita Barrett, Annette Williams, and Gloria Jones.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"Sad Fool" - The Rollettes - Class 201 - 1956.

Cash Box Review (9-1-56):

THE ROLLETTES — Class 201
Sad Fool (B)
The Rollettes blend effectively on a lilting slow beat pretty. The reading comes off in good style and the teeners should find it to their liking.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good". This reviewer also used "lilt" and "slow beat pretty" for the above Dreamers' Flip 319 review.)



MORE RICHARD BERRY

Above Left: Photo of Richard Berry. [The above photo provided by Hans-Joachim Krohberger.]

Above Right: Label image for Flair 1055, released in October 1954. Richard Berry had previously filled in with The Robins to sing lead on their "Riot In Cell Block #9", released in May 1954. That song is included in the "Modern Records - Part Six" article.

As happened with several of Richard Berry's songs for Modern/RPM/Flair, the Bihari brothers took [stole?] credit as co-composers. BMI for "The Big Break" has Richard Berry and Joe Josea (aka Joe Bihari) as the writers. Anytime Josea, Taub, or Ling are shown as a composer, it is one of the Bihari brothers.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"The Big Break" - Richard Berry (With The Crowns) - Flair 1055 - 1954.

THE BILLBOARD, October 16, 1954: TALENT SPOTLIGHT
RICHARD BERRY — The Big Break — Flair 1055
Richard Berry, a talking warbler, does a sensational job here with a powerful piece of material. The tune "The Big Break" is almost a follow up to "Cell Block Number 9". It's funny, yet with a moral.

CASH BOX, October 30, 1954:
....Harry Aposteleris, Alpha Distributors, reports he has four platters that are really moving. They are "Earth Angel" by the Penguins on Dootone; "The Letter" by the Medallions on Dootone; "God Only Knows" by the Capris on Gotham; and "The Big Break" by Richard Berry on Flair....

Above Left: Label image for Flair 1064, released in 1955. Again, BMI credits Joe Josea (Joe Bihari) as co-composer.

Above Right: Label image for Flair 1075, released in 1955. Disco-File shows the vocal group backing Richard Berry on this side is The Dreamers, consisting of Fanita Barrett, Johnny Coleman, Gloria Jones, Annette Williams, and Nannette Williams.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Please Tell Me" - Richard Berry (With Vocal Group) - Flair 1064 - 1955.
2. "Jelly Roll" - Richard Berry (With Vocal Group) - Flair 1075 - 1955.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

The Billboard Review (2/26/55):

RICHARD BERRY — Flair 1064
Please Tell Me
(71) An okay warbling job on a slow-based ballad. However, flip ["Oh! Oh! Get Out Of The Car" (75)] is the better side.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)

Cash Box Review (3-12-55):

RICHARD BERRY — Flair 1064
Please Tell Me (B+)
Richard Berry chants a slow blues ballad with a melancholy air. Tune is pretty and has a sentimental appeal.
(NOTE: A rating of B+ was considered as "excellent".)

CASH BOX, March 12, 1955:
....It doesnít surprise us to learn that Richard Berry and "Please Tell Me" is making its way straight to the hearts of the nationís record buyers, for this writer has thought Berry long overdue for a smasheroo. This one has a good start at this penning and with a little more attention and exposure could pull in a whole pile of loot....

CASH BOX, April 2, 1955:
....Showing strong on the Flair front is the Richard Berry pressing of "Please Tell Me" b/w "Get Out Of The Car"....

CASH BOX, April 30, 1955:
....We hear that Modern Records Caravan package is setting new attendance records everywhere they appear in the South. Unit includes Etta James, Richard Berry, Johnny "Guitar" Watson, and Big Jim Wynnís Band. They will continue their tour of ballroom and club dates on throughout the South, into Miami, Florida, and North along the East Coast. Package has been set to open at the Apollo Theatre in Gotham around June 1....

The Billboard Review (8/27/55):

RICHARD BERRY — Flair 1075
Jelly Roll
(71) A moderately paced rolling chant is growled effectively by Berry and supporting cast. Tangy material.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)

THE BILLBOARD, April 30, 1956:
....Modern was named defendant in an action by singer Richard Berry, under contract (with them), in Los Angeles Superior Court here last week. Berry asks for an accounting of royalties allegedly due him.



EXTRA RECORD — THE RAMS

Above: The Rams were a trio consisting of (Left) Richard Berry, (Right) Arthur Lee Maye, and Johnny Coleman, the bass singer who had been with The Dreamers and The Crowns.

This is pure conjecture, but it seems reasonable that The Rams might have been named after Buck Ram, who managed The Flairs and several other Modern/RPM artists.

[The above right photo provided by Hans-Joachim Krohberger.]

Above: Label images for both sides of Flair 1066, released in March 1955. "Rock Bottom" had been released in 1947 on the Modern label by Gene Phillips And His Rhythm Aces. That label shows "Newman-Libowsky" as the composers. Phillips' version is included in the "Modern Records - Part One" article.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Rock Bottom" - The Rams - Flair 1066 - 1955.
2. "Sweet Thing" - The Rams - Flair 1066 - 1955.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

The Billboard Review (3-26-55):

THE RAMS — Flair 1066
Rock Bottom
(76) A happy sounding novelty with a driving beat. The boys wrap the ditty up with showmanly charm, This one should do all right spin-wise.
Sweet Thing (73) An appealing vocal version of a pleasant tune sparked by strong rhythmic pacing.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".")


          CROWN RECORDS                

THE BILLBOARD, December 5, 1953: BIHARI'S CROWN R. & B. LABEL BOWS
HOLLYWOOD—Jules Bihari, prexy of Cadet Pressing Company here and previously associated with the Modern and RPM record firms, this week bowed his entry in the rhythm and blues field via a label tagged Crown Records.

Bihari disclosed the signing of four artists to term papers with the firm. Under contract are Vido Musso, Joe Houston, Willie McDaniels [sic], and Lorenzo Holden.

Initial releases of the new label have already been cut, with Bihari currently setting nationwide distribution.

THE BILLBOARD, May 15, 1954: EXPANSION BY BIHARI BROTHERS
HOLLYWOOD—The brothers Bihari, Saul; Joe; Jules, will effect a consolidation of their disk facilities within a month, with the scheduled completion of recording studios and office space adjacent to Jules Bihari's Cadet Record Pressing Company in Culver City.

At an investment of approximately $15,000, Saul Bihari's Modern and RPM labels, Joe Bihari's Flair firm, and Jules' Crown label will pool recording studio, office space, and pressing services in the first of a series of moves aimed at expanding the operation of their interests.

New construction will total 5,000 square feet, with the recording studio to be equipped with Ampex tape machines, Lansing sound systems, and RCA mixing panels.

THE BILLBOARD, August 14, 1954: RCA CLAIMS BREACH IN SUIT VS. BIHARI
HOLLYWOOD—Action filed in U. S. Federal Court here last week by RCA Victor against Jules Bihari asked for $5,000 in damages and a temporary restraining order arising out of an alleged breach of contract.

Plaintiff contends that Bihari had purchased an unspecified amount of scrap record material, in which a number of defective whole records bearing the Mercury, Clef, and Norgran labels appeared. RCA Victor complains that the scrap was sold with the understanding that Bihari would use same as salvage to be melted.

Plattery contends that Bihari separated the whole records and sold them to outlets thruout the nation.


JULES BIHARI


WILLARD McDANIEL
Above: 1946 photo of The Red Callender Trio, (L-R) Leonard Ennois (guitar), Red Callender (bass fiddle), and Willard McDaniel (piano). Willard was a singer, pianist, composer, and orchestra leader. He played piano for Red Callender, Roy Milton, Maxwell Davis, and Gene Phillips And His Rhythm Aces. Willard had been a session musician for Modern and Specialty, and also had records on the Specialty label under his own name.

CALIFORNIA EAGLE, February 3, 1949:
Maxwell Davis, whose arrangements are constantly being sought a fter by several recording companies, led two recording sessions for Exclusive Records last week. "Max" backed up his own "tenor saxing" with "Red" Callender, bass; Herman Mitchell, guitar; Vernon Smith, trumpet; Willard McDaniel, piano; and (others).

Above: Label images for both sides of Crown 101, released in 1953. True to tradition, yet another red label with silver print and a silver circle around border.

Notice that there is no composer credit on either label. ASCAP shows composers of "Your Feet's..." are Ada Benson and Fred Fisher. BMI has Mac Wiseman, the bluegrass singer/guitarist, as the composer of "Waiting For Ships That Never Come in".

Willard did have another record on the Crown label, "My Sin" and "The Curse Of An Aching Heart", Crown 107, released in 1954.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Your Feet's Too Big" - Willard McDaniel And His Orchestra - Crown 101 - 1953.
2. "I'm Waiting For Ships That Never Come In" - Willard McDaniel And His Orchestra - Crown 101 - 1953.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

VALLEY TIMES (North Hollywood, CA), July 27, 1956:
Willard McDaniel, who reminds very much of the late "Fats" Waller, is now at the piano-bar at Ventura Inn. Willard just finished a solid six years at the Mermaid Room in L.A.


At Left: VALLEY TIMES (North Hollywood, CA), October 11, 1957. (Willard McDaniel)

Above: VALLEY TIMES (North Hollywood, CA), December 13, 1957.





Above: Photo of Willard McDaniel at the piano.



EXTRA RECORDS — "YOUR FEET'S TOO BIG"

Your Feet's Too Big was composed by Fred Fisher with lyrics by Ada Benson. It was first recorded by The Ink Spots on January 4, 1935 and released on Victor Records that same month. Others to record it include Willard McDaniel And His Orchestra (see directly above), "Fats" Waller And His Rhythm, and Erskine Butterfield and His Blue Boys.

Above Left: Photo of Fats Waller.

Above Right: Photo of Erskine Butterfield.

DAILY NEWS, October 1, 1940:
Fancy Dan—named Erskine Butterfield, is one of the few stylists in the boogie-woogie piano-playing field. This colored keyboard expert is a polished technician, skillful, and extremely listenable.

But there is no in-between attitude on barrel-house pianists. You either like them or are bored stiff. Butterfield happens to be a tin god for boogie-woogie enthusiasts.

Above Left: Label image for Bluebird B-10500-A, recorded on November 3, 1939 and released in 1939.

Above Right: Label image for Decca 3209 A, recorded on May 27, 1940 and released in 1940.

Somehow Decca thought it right to add "Ink Spots" as composers to the label. The Ink Spots' first version, on Victor 24851-A in 1935, incorrectly has "Jack Hancock" as the sole composer. Their second version, on Decca 817 A in 1936, has "Ada Benson- Fred Fisher" depicted on the label. Neither version gives any songwriting credit to The Inks Spots.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Your Feet's Too Big" - "Fats" Waller And His Rhythm - Bluebird B-10500-A - 1939.
2. "Your Feet's Too Big" - Erskine Butterfield And His Blue Boys - Decca 3209 A - 1940.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


FATS WALLER AND HIS RHYTHM

FATS WALLER VIDEO

WATCH Fats Waller performing "Your Feet's Too Big" from a 1941 Soundie in MP4 format. (Will open in a new window)

Fats Waller plays piano, sings, and mugs it up. There are several dancers, including Mabel Lee ("Queen of the Soundies"). She's to the left of Fats in the picture. Fifteen years later, Mabel was backed by an uncredited vocal group on Hull Records #712 "Dearest Dream"/"He's My Guy".


THE DRIFTERS
Above: Label images for both sides of Crown 108, recorded on December 30, 1953 and released in February 1954. The Drifters here are most likely The Robins. For sure, The Robins' bass Bobby Nunn is on both sides of this record.

Notice, again, that there is no composer credit on either label. BMI shows "Jules Bihari" as composer for both songs.

The Robins on Crown 106, "I Made A Vow" and "Double Crossin Blues", is included in the "Modern Records - Part Six" article.

Cash Box Review (2-27-54):

THE DRIFTERS — Crown 108
Sacroiliac Swing (C+)
The Drifters etch a middle tempo swing item melodically. A catchy tune.
The World Is Changing (C+) The flip is a slow blues smoothly performed. A romantic item.
(NOTE: A rating of C+ was considered as "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "The World Is Changing" - The Drifters - Crown 108 - 1954.
2. "Sacroiliac Swing" - The Drifters - Crown 108 - 1954.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


THE ORIGINAL JUBALAIRES
Above: Photo of The Jubalaires, (L to R) Orville Brooks, Ted Brooks, Caleb Ginyard and George McFadden. Not sure who was in the "Original Jubalaires" group, except it included one of the two Brooks. Caleb Ginyard had gone on to form The Du-Droppers in 1952. Orville Brooks had been singing with The Golden Gate Quartet in the early 1950s and in 1953 joined Gene Mumford to form the second Larks group.
Above: Label images for both sides of Crown 111, released in March 1954. BMI credits Jules Bihari and Jimmie Cook as the composers of "Dreaming Of The Ladies In The Moon".

The Catalog of Copyright Entries shows a May 17, 1948 entry for "Florence Crissman" as composer of "I'm Dreaming Of The Ladies In The Moon". BMI credits Florence with composing just one song, "Sugar Coated Lies".

The Bihari brothers would change the title of some of their composer claimed songs by either adding or removing "I'm" or "I've" (see "I'm Waiting For Ships That Never Come In", further up on this page, as another example).

The Billboard Review (4-17-54):

THE ORIGINAL JUBALAIRES — Crown 111
Dreaming Of The Ladies In The Moon (78)
The boys come thru with a strong reading here on a bright new ballad with an evocative flavor. The group handles this tune in Mills Brothers style, which will help get the side some attention. Should pull many jock spins, and it has a chance to break.
Waiting All My Life For You (67) A pretty ballad is handled sweetly by the listenable group. Side could get spins.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 60-69 considered as "satisfactory" and 70-79 as "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Waiting All My Life For You" - The Original Jubalaires - Crown 111 - 1954.
2. "Dreaming Of The Ladies In The Moon" - The Original Jubalaires - Crown 111 - 1954.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Above: Label images for both sides of Crown 118, released in June 1954. The Original Jubalaires had just these two records on the Crown label.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Little Church Of Capistrano" - The Original Jubalaires - Crown 118 - 1954.
2. "You Won't Let Me Go" - The Original Jubalaires - Crown 118 - 1954.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.



EXTRA RECORDS — "I'VE WAITED ALL MY LIFE FOR YOU"

The first version of this song was by The Jubalaires on Queen 4166-B, recorded in February 1947 and released the following month. Orville Brooks (along with Ted Brooks, George McFadden, John Jennings, and Bill Lee Johnson-guitarist) released "I've Waited All My Life For You" on Coral 65000 in 1948.

King (Queen's parent label) released a bass lead version of "I've Waited All My Life For You" on King 4325 in 1949.

I've Waited All My Life For You was composed by Ted Brooks (BMI confirmed), who was a member of The Jubalaires and possibly a member of The Original Jubalaires. Somehow BMI credits The Original Jubalaires' version ("Waiting All My Life...") to Orville Brooks and Joe Bihari. Orville was Ted's brother.

It's unknown to me why Bissell Palmer is shown as a co-composer on both the Crown and Coral labels. Palmer was a lyricist who had some hit songs in the early-to-mid 1940s, but what is the connection here?

Above Left: Label image for Queen 4166-B, recorded February 1947. This is The Jubalaires' first of four records on the Queen label, all released in 1947. They also had five records, one a Queen reissue, on the King label (1947-1950).

Above Right: Label image for Coral 65000 B, recorded on August 13, 1947 and released in October 1948. This would seem to be the first record in Coral's 65000 Rhythm and Blues Series. It's interesting that Coral (or someone) decided to credit the artist as "Orville Brooks" with no mention of a vocal group backing.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "I've Waited All My Life For You" - The Jubalaires - Queen 4166-B - 1947.
2. "I've Waited All My Life For You" - Orville Brooks (And The Jubalaires) - Coral 65000 B - 1948.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

"I've Waited All My Life For You" - The Jubalaires - King 4325-A - 1949.
(For comparison purposes)

OMAHA GUIDE, July 19, 1947: JUBALAIRES, FIVE-MAN SINGING GROUP SENSATION
A quartet, according to Webster, is "a group consisting of four". A lot Mr. Webster knows! The Jubalaires are a quartet consisting of five men....

Nearly everyone automatically spells the name "Jubileers", basing the spelling on the word "jubilee". And that is very, very wrong. They're the Jubalaires, and they take their name from Jubal, Biblical figure who is called the father of all harpists and organists....

There are five of them, but only four sing on any given song. Let's say the Jubalaires are doing "Preacher And The Bear" or some similar comedy number. In that case, you'll find Willie Johnson singing lead, with John Jennings second tenor, Ted Brooks baritone, and George McFadden bass.

On a folk song or spiritual, Caleb Ginyard takes over the lead, John slides down from tenor to baritone, and Brooks retires to the sidelines. A popular tune finds Jennings singing lead, with Brooks back in the lineup as second tenor, and Johnson singing baritone.

Throughout all this shifting around, bass George McFadden is the only one of the five who stays put....

(Another) member of the quartet is Simley Trotman, pianist, who joined the group about four months ago....



EXTRA RECORDS — "YOU WON'T LET ME GO"

Per BMI, the song "You Won't Let Me Go" was composed by pianist and orchestra leader Buddy Johnson along with Bud Allen. It was first released by Buddy Johnson And His Band on Decca's "Sepia Series" in 1940, the label crediting "Johnson" as the lone composer.

"You Won't Let Me Go" was also released by Johnny Moore And His Three Blazers on Modern Music in 1946, Hadda Brooks Trio on Modern Music in 1946, Ollie Shepard And His Orchestra on Coral in 1949, The Four Dots on Dot in 1951, and The Original Jubalaires on Crown in 1954. With three versions of the song on Modern Records labels, the Biharis must have liked it! The Johnny Moore label does not show any composer. The Hadda Brooks, Four Dots, and Original Jubalaires labels credit only "Johnson" as composer.


HADDA BROOKS
Above: Still shot of Hadda Brooks at the piano from the 1950 film, "In A Lonely Place".
Hadda has been previously covered in the "Modern Records - Part One" and "Modern Records - Part Three" articles.
Above Left: Hadda Brooks performing. [This image provided by Hans-Joachim Krohberger.]

Above Middle: Label image for Modern 146A, originally released on Modern Music 146A in 1946.

Above Right: CASH BOX, November 4, 1946.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"You Won't Let Me Go" - Hadda Brooks Trio - Modern Music 146A - 1946.


THE FOUR DOTS



Above Left: CASH BOX, April 7, 1951. Notice that Dot Records made the significant improvement from shellac to "unbreakable plastic material" in 1951.

Above Middle: Label image for Dot 1043 A, released in March 1951. The Four Dots were from the Washington, DC, area. Disco-File shows the members, on this record, are George Davis, Wilbert Beal, Floyd Brown, and Rudolph Harris. It was their only record.

A completely different group, The Five Dots, released one record on the Dot label in June 1954.

Above Right: RICHMOND TIMES DISPATCH, December 25, 1953.
(NOTE: Brothers "Buddy" Griffin on piano and Jimmy Griffin on trombone.)

LISTEN TO ALL THREE VERSIONS (Windows Media Player):
1. "You Won't Let Me Go" - The Original Jubalaires - Crown 118 - 1954.
2. "You Won't Let Me Go" - Hadda Brooks Trio - Modern Music 146A - 1946.
3. "You Won't Let Me Go" - The Four Dots - Dot 1043 - 1951.

ALL THREE SONGS played in sequence.


KAY BROWN (WITH VOCAL GROUP)
Above: Photo of Kay Brown when she was the featured singer with Stan Kenton's orchestra in the early 1950s.
Above Left: Another photo of Kay Brown.

Above Right: Label image for Crown 127, released in September 1954. The flip-side, "Oop-Shoop", is included in the "Modern Records - Part Seven" article.

Cash Box Review (9-18-54):

KAY BROWN — Crown 127
Love Me (B)
A good piece of rhythm and blues material is belted across by Kay Brown in a fashion thatíll sell in both the blues and pop markets. Good commercial deck.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good".)

The Billboard Review (9-18-54):

KAY BROWN — Crown 127
Love Me
(70) Gal sings out on a bluesy ballad in the metallic-voiced Kay Starr tradition.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"Love Me" - Kay Brown (With Vocal Group) - Crown 127 - 1954.



EXTRA RECORDS — "LOVE ME"

The song "Love Me" was composed by prolific songwriters Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. It was first released on their Spark label by Willy & Ruth in 1954.

Other versions in 1954 include those by Kay Brown (see directly above), The DeMarco Sisters (Decca), Billy Eckstine (M-G-M), Georgia Gibbs (Mercury), The Four Escorts (RCA Victor), Connie Russell (Capitol), The Billy Williams Quartet (Coral), and The Woodside Sisters ("X").

All of the above versions that were reviewed by The Billboard, Cash Box, and/or Variety magazines were rated either "good" or "very good".

Of course, the most well-known version is by Elvis Presley on RCA Victor, released on EP & LP format in 1956.

STAR GAZETTE (Elmira, NY), June 20, 1957: ROCK 'N' ROLL TO FAME
HOLLYWOOD—Two guys responsible for many of the raucous rhythms coming out of the nation's juke boxes are Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, both 23. Their rock 'n' rollers have helped propel Elvis Presley and others to a national craze.

"Hound Dog"... "Black Denim Trousers And Motorcycle Boots"... "Love Me"... these are a few of their hits. And there are more to come....

Presley songs are guaranteed to sell at least a million records and can go from three to five. "Hound Dog" sold five. "Love Me" totaled two and one-half million—and it was never put out as a single record! It was included as the lead song in an album....

(Leiber and Stoller) first invaded the blues field. Among their blues hits: "Hard Times" (Charles Brown, 1952), "K.C. Loving" (Little Willie Littlefield, 1952)....and "Hound Dog" (Willie Mae Thornton, 1952).

When the blues field moved into the general market as rhythm and blues or rock 'n' roll, the boys got their big break. It came when Elvis heard a combo sing "Hound Dog" in Las Vegas.


MIKE STOLLER AND JERRY LEIBER


WILLY & RUTH
Above Left: Label image for Crown 105, released in 1954. This is the second of two records by Willy & Ruth on the Spark label. Willy (who was Willie Headen) also had two other releases on Spark as lead singer of The Honey Bears.

Above Right: PITTSBURGH COURIER, May 29, 1954: RECORD STAR
Willie Headen, new blues discovery, is headed for the top as his first disc, "I Love You, Bobby Sox", is a big seller. Headen, under contract to Dootone Record Company, is being currently booked on a series of one-nighters throughout Southern California by the Johnny Barnette Agency.

(NOTE: Willie Headen had two vocal group records on Dootone's subsidiary label, Authentic Records, as "Willie Headen And The Five Birds", both released in 1956.)

THE BILLBOARD (5-1-54): SPARK RECORDS PACTS TALENT
Les Sill and Jack Levy, of Spark Records, Inc., Hollywood, last week announced the signing of saxophonist Gil Bernal and the vocal teams of Willie and Ruth and the Honeybears. Initial sides have already been cut and released to distributors.

THE BILLBOARD (8-14-54): REVIEW SPOTLIGHT ON... RECORDS
WILLY AND RUTH — Spark 105 — Love Me/Cordelia
A new duo Willy and Ruth, come thru with an insinuating vocal on a mighty pretty pop ballad titled "Love Me". On the flip they sell another ballad with feeling. On both sides they are backed with a beat by the ork. This could bust loose.

(NOTE: Yes, Billboard used the word "insinuating" in this review! Not sure how that would apply here.)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"Love Me" - Willy & Ruth - Spark 105 - 1954.


THE WOODSIDE SISTERS
Above Left: Photo of The Woodside Sisters.

Above Right: PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, February 20, 1952: TRIPLE FEATURE
The three Woodside Sisters, three times winners of the Ted Mack Original Amateur Hour award, who will appear in the Philadelphia premiere at Convention Hall tomorrow night....

Above Left: Label image for "X" X-0049, recorded on August 9, 1954 and released that same month. This is the second record of two that The Woodside Sisters had on RCA Victor's subsidiary "X" label, both released in 1954.

The "Vocal Quartet" referenced on the label is The Harptones, who are the background vocalists on this record.

Above Right: DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE (Rochester, NY), September 21, 1954.

Above: 1954 photo of The Harptones, (L to R) William Dempsey, Billy Brown, Willie Winfield, Dicey Galloway, and Nicky Clark. Disco-File names the same personnel for this record, except for the addition of Raoul Cita.
[The above photo provided by Hans-Joachim Krohberger.]

CASH BOX, April 24, 1954: "X" SIGNS ARTISTS
NEW YORK—"X", which has been building up its roster since its inception early this year, has announced the signing of several new artists. They are: The Wilder Brothers; Woodside Sisters; Andy Williams; Buddy Jayson; and A1 Wallis.


DIRECTLY ABOVE: THE BILLBOARD — AUGUST 21, 1954

Above Left: CASH BOX, April 24, 1954: NEWCOMERS
NEW YORK—The Woodside Sisters, from left to right: Mary, Jane, and Alice Woodside are getting a little instruction from Jimmy Hilliard, A & R head of "X" Records during their recent session for the label. The girls, who are signed to a long-term pact with "X", will have their first release of "Half As Lonesome" and "Stay A Little Longer" due out May 10th.

Cash Box Review (9-4-54):

WOODSIDE SISTERS — "X" 0049
Love Me (B)
The thrushes give out with a solid rhythm and blues type reading of a good tune. They get a terrific vocal and ork support too.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good".)

HAWAII TRIBUNE HERALD, June 16, 1955: MAKING A HIT
Three lovely songsters — The Woodside Sisters — have been making a big hit every evening since their debut in Hilo on Tuesday evening with the crowds at the Ocean View Club.

The attractive trio — Jane, Mary, and Alice — are from Youngstown, Ohio, and went on the road to success after winning first place honors in Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scout Show in 1954.

Dixieland Medley, a catchy combination of Dixieland favorites, was the Woodside Sisters' winning song. The girls are RCA Victor recording stars who have just completed a successful engagement at the South Seas in Honolulu.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"Love Me" - The Woodside Sisters (With The Harptones) - "X" X-0049 - 1954.


HAWAII TRIBUNE HERALD — JUNE 17, 1955


BILLY ECKSTINE
Above: Photo of Billy Eckstine. Information about Billy can be found in the "Modern Records - Part Three" article.
Above Left: FORT WORTH STAR, March 9, 1954.

Above Middle: BOSTON GLOBE, October 8, 1954.

Above Right: Label image for M-G-M 11855, released in 1954. Wonder if Leiber or Stoller ever expected a full orchestra production like this one when they wrote the song for Willy & Ruth?

The Billboard Review (10-16-54):

BILLY ECKSTINE — M-G-M 11855
Love Me
(76) One of Eckstine's best sides in a long time is this version of the tune which is so heavily recorded. With exposure he could make plenty of noise with it.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"Love Me" - Billy Eckstine - M-G-M 11855 - 1954.


GEORGIA GIBBS
Above Left: EVANSVILLE COURIER, June 30, 1954.
(NOTE: Merriam-Webster defines "nibs" as "an important or self-important person—usually used in the phrases his nibs or her nibs as if a title of honor". It's likely a sales publicist came up with "her nibs" for Georgia because it rhymes with "Miss Gibbs. Reserved seats at the bargain price of $2.50.)

Above Right: Photo of Georgia Gibbs.

Above Left: Evening Sun (Baltimore, MD), March 9, 1954.

Above Right: Label image for Mercury 70473, released in 1954.

The Billboard Review (10-23-54):

GEORGIA GIBBS — Mercury 70473
Love Me
(72) The canary tries an r.&b. kick on these two sides, but it doesn't suit her style. She's much better with pop material.
Mambo Baby (71) Same comment.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"Love Me" - Georgia Gibbs (With Vocal Group) - Mercury 70473 - 1954.

Above: CASH BOX, October 23, 1954: DISK OF THE WEEK

LISTEN TO ALL FIVE VERSIONS (Windows Media Player):
1. "Love Me" - Kay Brown (With Vocal Group) - Crown 127 - 1954.
2. "Love Me" - Willy & Ruth - Spark 105 - 1954.
3. "Love Me" - The Woodside Sisters (With The Harptones) - "X" X-0049 - 1954.
4. "Love Me" - Billy Eckstine - M-G-M 11855 - 1954.
5. "Love Me" - Georgia Gibbs (With Vocal Group) - Mercury 70473 - 1954.

ALL FIVE SONGS played in sequence.


BONUS — "MAMBO BABY"

NOTE: It's well-known that Georgia Gibbs "stole" LaVern Baker's arrangement of "Tweedle Dee", performing an exact duplicate in every aspect. But lesser known is that prior to that, Georgia did the same thing to Ruth Brown with "Mambo Baby", even unsuccessfully trying to copy Ruth's voice. And prior to that, another Mercury stablemate, Patti Page, did it to Ruth Brown with "Oh What A Dream".

Above Left: Photo of Ruth Brown, who does not look happy with Georgia Gibbs and her duplication of "Mambo Baby".

Above Right: THE BILLBOARD, October 23, 1954.
(NOTE: Here it seems that Georgia, looking like the cat who ate the mouse, is holding up her hand asking Ruth "Please don't glare at me". It's clear from this clipping that Mercury was pushing the "Mambo Baby" side a lot more than the "Love Me" side!)

Above Left: Label image for Mercury 70473, released in 1954.

Above Right: Label image for Atlantic 1044, recorded on August 11, 1954 and released in 1954.

"Singleton-McCoy" are shown as composers on both of the above labels. They are Charles Singleton and Rose Marie McCoy, who were a song-writing team from 1954 to the early 1960s. They were both, especially McCoy, prolific composers for many of the top stars of the time, mostly black artists.

From Ruth Brown's autobiography, MISS RHYTHM:
"....throughout my biggest hit-making period I was forced to stand by as white singers like Georgia Gibbs and Patti Page duplicated my records note for note and were able to plug them on top television shows like The Ed Sullivan Show, to which I had no access."

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Mambo Baby " - Georgia Gibbs (With Vocal Group) - Mercury 70473 - 1954.
2. "Mambo Baby " - Ruth Brown And Her Rhythmakers - Atlantic 1044 - 1954.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Above: CASH BOX, October 9, 1954: AWARD O' THE WEEK




          METEOR RECORDS                


LESTER BIHARI IN FRONT OF METEOR RECORDS OFFICES

Meteor Records, owned and operated by Lester Bihari, was located in Memphis, TN. It existed from 1952 to 1958. Their specialties were rhythm and blues, country and western, and gospel music.

Some of the artists with records on the Meteor label are Elmore James, J. T. Brown, Earl Forrest, Carl Green, Chicago Sunny Boy, Jimmy Wright's Orchestra, Smokey Hogg, Junior Thompson, Rufus Thomas, and Little Milton.

NOVEMBER, 1952 — Les Bihari hits the markets shortly with a new recording company called Meteor. Headquarters will be in Memphis, close to the pressing plant of Buster Williams.

Label cut its first session a few days ago. Four sides were made in the record time of 22 minutes. Only using four people, Bihari comes up with two sides in real down home blues fashion, while the other two sides are hot and fast horn items.

With distribution already set on a national scale, and the use of a Memphis plant plus a West Coast presser, the man's in business.

DECEMBER, 1952BIHARI SETS METEOR LABEL
MEMPHIS, Tenn.—A new indie r.&b. recording firm, Meteor Records, was organized here this week by Lester Bihari. Bihari was heretofore associated with his brothers' Modern and RPM diskeries as Memphis rep, handling pressing and distribution.

Meteor has inked Elmore James, ex-Trumpet* (Records) artist, whose first release is "I Believe" and "I Held My Baby Last Night". Bep Brown, r.&b. sax tootler, tees off with "Round House Boogie" and "Kickin' The Blues Around"....

(*NOTE: Trumpet Records was located in Jackson, Mississippi. Elmore James lived about fifty miles north of Jackson.)

DECEMBER, 1952 — ....Little Son Jackson will cut late this week in Houston for the Meteor label....
(NOTE: It does not appear that any sides where ever released on Meteor by Jackson.)

ELMORE JAMES AND HIS BAND

CASH BOX — DECEMBER 6, 1952

Above: Photo of Elmore James With His Band. Note the "EJ" on Elmore's guitar. On back wall, the notice is for Big Bill Broonzy.
Above: Label images for both sides of Meteor 5000, recorded on November 22, 1952 and released in 1952. Label colors are in keeping with the Bihari tradition of red with silver print. On "I Held My Baby...", is he really saying what it sounds like at about 0:45 into the song?

BMI gives full composer credit to Elmore James for "I Believe" and "I Held My Baby Last Night". Interestingly, BMI assigns both Elmore James and Joe Bihari as writers of "I Believe I'll Go Back Home" and "I Believe My Time Ain't Long", which are two of the lines in the song "I Believe"! Very clever, those Bihari brothers! They not only knew every trick in the book, but invented new ones along the way.

MORE TO THE STORY: The actual, original name of the song is "Dust My Broom". BMI credits Elmore James and Robert Leroy Johnson as composers of that song. It was in 1936 that blues singer Johnson was first to record the song. Elmore James originally recorded it for Trumpet Records, using the "Dust My Broom" title, on August 5, 1951. It was released on Trumpet 146 in 1951 with "Elmo James" as the only composer shown on the label.

A Trumpet ad, placed in The Billboard on January 7, 1953, touts the song as "THE ORIGINAL BY ELMORE JAMES!" (See at right)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "I Believe" - Elmore James - Meteor 5000 - 1952.
2. "I Held My Baby Last Night" - Elmore James - Meteor 5000 - 1952.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

"Dust My Broom" - Elmo James - Trumpet 146 - 1951.
(For comparison purposes) (Sonny Boy Williamson is playing the harmonica.)



ABOVE: THE BILLBOARD — JANUARY 7, 1953

CASH BOX AWARD O' THE WEEK — JANUARY 3, 1953

Above: CASH BOX, January 24, 1953.
(NOTE: Was this actually a truthful request? Or a ploy to convey the records had become hits!
Remember that the Bihari brothers were tricky guys.)

CASH BOX, December 6, 1952:
....Bep Brown does a fast release for the Meteor label called "Kickiní The Blues Around"; and for the same whip cracker, Elmore James, remember his "Dust My Broom"?, does one called "I Held My Baby Last Night". If you listen carefully, you can almost hear him holding his lady love....

CASH BOX, December 20, 1952:
....Elmore James, who made a big noise awhile back with his "Dust My Broom", is playing these days with Bep Brown, better known as J. T. "Nature Boy" Brown. The boys are working one-niters in the midwest....

CASH BOX, January 3, 1953:
....Hear tell that Les Bihariís new Meteor label is off íní flying with a hot one in "I Believe" by Elmore James....

CASH BOX, January 10, 1953:
....Thereís no holding the Bihari clan down. Brother Lester Bihari has a winner in his first release via "I Believe" with Elmore James....

The Billboard Review (1-3-53):

ELMORE JAMES — Meteor 5000
I Believe
(82) Solid shouting by James of a powerful blues effort, to strong ork support. This is a potent side and could crack thru as a big one for the warbler. A real coin grabber.
I Held My Baby Last Night (77) James projects this slowly beat blues with great persuasive power for an impressive waxing. Side could stir up some action.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good" and 80-89 as "excellent".)
Above: Label images for both sides of Meteor 5003, recorded on November 22, 1952 and released in 1953.

Cash Box Review (5-2-53):

ELMORE JAMES — Meteor 5003
Baby What's Wrong (B+)
Elmore James belts a bouncing fast moving item as he complains about the way his baby treats him and pleads for her return. Orking in the breaks is wild.
Sinful Woman (B+) A change of pace item. James sings the slow blues with much feeling. Guitar backing is excellent.
(NOTE: A rating of B+ was considered as "excellent".)

The Billboard Review (5-2-53):

ELMORE JAMES — Meteor 5003
Baby What's Wrong
(76) Routine jump blues is given a strong performance by James, with the ork selling all the way. Could attract some juke loot.
Sinful Woman (73) James wails a sad weeper to Southern backing. He creates mournful mood as he presents this tale of duplicity. Should sell some.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Baby What's Wrong" - Elmore James - Meteor 5003 - 1953.
2. "Sinful Woman" - Elmore James - Meteor 5003 - 1953.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Above Left: Photo of Elmore James.

Above Right: Photo of J. T. Brown.

Above: Label images for both sides of Meteor 5016, released in 1954. "Broom Dusters" is a reference to Elmore James' hit record, "Dust My Broom", on the Trumpet label. "Sax-Ony" is an instrumental.

J. T. Brown was a tenor saxophone player, singer, songwriter, and orchestra leader. The "J. T." in Brown's name stands for "John Thomas". He was also known as "J. T. (Big Boy) Brown", "Sax Man Brown", and "Bep Brown". Both J. T. Brown and Elmore James were from Mississippi.

Same old story: The labels credit "J. T. Brown" as the lone composer, while BMI lists J. T. Brown and Joe Josea (Joe Bihari) as the songwriters for both sides.

Cash Box Review (9-18-54):

ELMO JAMES & SAX MAN BROWN — Meteor 5016
Dumb Woman Blues (B)
J. T (Big Boy) Brown handles the vocal end of this slow Southern blues. Brown sings his preferences in women. Heíd rather have a dumb woman than an educated girl from school. Lyrics, tune, vocal, and colorful saxing by Brown make this an effective deck.
Sax-Only Boogie (C+) A driving number featuring the lively and expressive saxing of Sax Man Brown. Elmo James and his Broom Dusters provide the spirited accompaniment. Teeners can knock themselves out with this etching.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good" and C+ as "good".)

(NOTE: Interesting that The Billboard and Cash Box ratings for this record are so far apart!)

The Billboard Review (9-18-54):

J. T. (BIG BOY) BROWN — Meteor 5016
Dumb Woman Blues
(67) Brown is not quite so efficient with a vocal as he is with his sax. This is a competent but rather run-of-the-mill blues that gets a nice rhythmic lift from the ork, but that's about all.
Sax-Ony Boogie (71) This instrumental makes a very exciting dance record. Led by Brown's high-flying tenor sax, the group jumps a mile a minute and will make the customers come back screaming for more.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 60-69 considered as "satisfactory" and 70-79 as "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Dumb Woman Blues" - J. T. (Big Boy) Brown With Elmo James Broom Dusters - Meteor 5016 - 1954.
2. "Sax-Ony Boogie" - Sax Man Brown With Elmo James Broom Dusters - Meteor 5016 - 1954.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.



EXTRA RECORDS — ELMORE JAMES ON FLAIR

Above Left: Label image for Flair 1011, recorded on April 1, 1953 and released in 1953. This song sound familiar? Guess if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Above Right: Label image for Flair 1014, recorded in April 1953 and released in 1953.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Early In The Morning" - Elmore James And The Broom Dusters - Flair 1011 - 1953.
2. "Make A Little Love" - Elmore James And His Broom Dusters - Flair 1014 - 1953.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

The Billboard Review (6-13-53):

ELMORE JAMES — Flair 1011
Early In The Morning
(78) Deep South blues. Plenty of quality in the vocal with typical guitar backing. Beat is strongly marked. Watch it.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)

Cash Box Review (6-13-53):

ELMORE JAMES — Flair 1011
Early In The Morning (B)
James shouts out a rhythmic middle tempo bounce energetically. A smart bit of guitar support rounds out an ok deck.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good".)

(NOTE: For whatever reason, Cash Box reviewed this record twice. See next.)

Cash Box Review (7-11-53):

ELMORE JAMES — Flair 1011
Early In The Morning (B+)
Elmore James etches a strong middle tempo Southern blues that should get powerful juke box action.
(NOTE: A rating of B+ was considered as "excellent".)

The Billboard Review (8-22-53):

ELMORE JAMES — Flair 1014
Make A Little Love
(77) James shouts his invitation to romance in convincing fashion. Another good slicing.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)

Cash Box Review (8-22-53):

ELMORE JAMES — Flair 1014
Make A Little Love (B+)
Elmore James, in his stylized delivery, sings a middle tempo bounce declaring his love. Guitar lends color to the disking.
(NOTE: A rating of B+ was considered as "excellent".)


          KENT RECORDS                

Above: Photo of Saul Bihari from the mid-1960s. He was the president of Kent Records located in Culver City, CA. The label began in 1958 and continued at least into the early-to-mid 1970s.

Some of the artists who had records released on the Kent label (from 1958 to 1960) are B. B. King, Hadda Brooks, Etta James, Floyd Dixon Orchestra, Sonny Knight, Jesse James, Jesse Belvin, Elmore James, John Lee Hooker, Woody Herman Orchestra, and Jimmy Witherspoon. You'll note that many of these were reissues of old Modern/RPM records.

During this period, it was B. B. King who had the preponderance of new records on Kent. He had seventeen out of the first fifty that were issued. From 1958 to 1970, B. B. King had 58 out of a total of 537 records.


Above: Photo of B. B. King. His time with RPM Records is included in the "Modern Records - Part Six" article.
Above: Label images for both sides of Kent 301, released in 1958. Surprise! Red label with silver print one more time.

Here we go again! "Why Do Everything Happen To Me" was composed (per BMI) and released by Roy Hawkins on the Modern label in 1950 (as "Why Do Things Happen To Me"). It became an r&b hit for him. The Modern label credits "Geddins" as the lone composer. That would be Bob Geddins, owner of Cava-Tone Records, for whom Roy Hawkins recorded prior to Modern. It is possible that Geddins sold the song to the Biharis of Modern Records. "Taub" is Jules Bihari and "Josea" is Joe Bihari.

Roy Hawkins is included in the "Modern Records - Part Three" article.

CASH BOX, May 17, 1958: B. B. KING RE-SIGNED TO KENT RECORDS
LOS ANGELES—Vocalist B. B. King has signed a new contract with Kent Records to record exclusively for that label for the next year and a half.

Kent is the new label owned by the Bihari Brothers, owners of the Modern, Crown, and RPM labels. Kingís first commercial record was released on the Modern label and he has been under contract to that firm for the past eight years.

B. B. Kingís sides will now be released on the Kent label on a regular releasing schedule.

Cash Box Review (3-29-58):

B. B. KING — Kent 301
You Know I Go For You (B+)
B. B. King wails a slow beat blues with his usually good vocal job. King sings of his woman, tells her how he goes for her, and how life is no good without her. Good, swinging blues the r & b fan should feel.
Why Do Everything Happen To Me (B) Another slow beat blues with interpretations similar to the flip deck. Another good, warm emotional r & b blues.
(NOTE: A rating of B+ was considered as "excellent" and B as "very good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "You Know I Go For You" - B. B. King - Kent 301 - 1958.
2. "Why Do Everything Happen To Me" - B. B. King - Kent 301 - 1958.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


THIS CONCLUDES THE "MODERN RECORDS" ARTICLES SPOTLIGHTING THE BIHARI BROTHERS' MODERN, COLONIAL, RPM, FLAIR, CROWN, METEOR, AND KENT LABELS.

MODERN RECORDS - PART ONE FEATURES HADDA BROOKS, PEARL TRAYLER, THE THREE BITS OF RHYTHM, GENE PHILLIPS, LITTLE WILLIE JACKSON, THE COMMANDERS, THE SCAMPS, AND THE SONGS "ROMANCE IN THE DARK", "I'LL BE TRUE", "LONESOME ROAD", AND "I'M FALLING FOR YOU".

MODERN RECORDS - PART TWO FEATURES LILLIE GREENWOOD, LITTLE WILLIE LITTLEFIELD, PEE WEE CRAYTON, LITTLE ESTHER, SMOKEY HOG, GEORGE BLEDSOE AND THE MOON MISTS, THE SMITH JUBILEE SINGERS, AND MODERN RECORDS' COLONIAL LABEL.

MODERN RECORDS - PART THREE FEATURES HADDA BROOKS, THE EBONAIRES, JIMMY WITHERSPOON, HELEN HUMES, THE SONGS "BEWILDERED", "BE-BABA-LEBA", AND "THEY RAIDED THE JOINT", PLUS MISCELLANEOUS MODERN RECORDS' BLUES ARTISTS (ROY HAWKINS, CHARLEY BOOKER, ROBERT BLAND, MARY SUE).

MODERN RECORDS - PART FOUR FEATURES JOHNNY MOORE'S THREE BLAZERS, MARI JONES, FRANKIE ERVIN, OSCAR McLOLLIE, YOUNG JESSIE, JIMMY McCRACKLIN, JOHN LEE HOOKER, AND THE FOUR OF US. ALSO, THE SONGS "DRIFTING BLUES", "MY SONG", "C.O.D.", AND "I SMELL A RAT".

MODERN RECORDS - PART FIVE FEATURES JESSE BELVIN, THE CLIQUES, JIMMY BEASLEY, THE CADETS/JACKS, DOLLY COOPER, ETTA JAMES, THE COBRAS, FRED DARIAN AND THE DREAMERS, JIMMIE LEE AND ARTIS, THE SOUNDS, AND THE ROCKETS. ALSO, THE SONGS "NEAR YOU", "ROLLIN' STONE", "SIXTY MINUTE MAN", "I GOT LOADED", "STRANDED IN THE JUNGLE", "THE HENRY SONGS", AND "SINDY (CINDY)".

MODERN RECORDS - PART SIX FEATURES B. B. KING, THE NIC NACS, THE ROBINS, ARTHUR LEE MAYE AND THE CROWNS, DONNA HIGHTOWER (WITH VOCAL GROUP), JOE HOUSTON, ROSCOE GORDON, LIGHTNING HOPKINS, AND LUKE JONES. ALSO, THE SONGS "DON'T YOU THINK I OUGHTA KNOW" AND "SHTIGGY BOOM".

MODERN RECORDS - PART SEVEN FEATURES THE TEEN QUEENS, JIMMY NELSON, THE CHANTERS, CURTIS IRVIN AND THE SPARKS, BUDDY MILTON AND THE TWILIGHTERS, LITTLE GEORGE SMITH, THE FLAIRS, THE CHIMES, SHIRLEY GUNTER AND THE QUEENS, KAY BROWN (WITH VOCAL GROUP), BOBBY RELF AND THE LAURELS, AND MERCY DEE. ALSO, THE SONGS "EDDIE MY LOVE", "OOP SHOOP", AND "HEADIN' HOME".


Listen to all of this article's audio selections using Windows Media Player:

          1. "At Last" - The Dreamers Featuring Richard Berry - Flair 1052 - 1954.
          2. "Bye Bye" - The Dreamers Featuring Richard Berry - Flair 1052 - 1954.
          3. "Since You've Been Gone" - The Dreamers - Flip 319 - 1957.
          4. "Do Not Forget" - The Dreamers - Flip 319 - 1957.
          5. "Sad Fool" - The Rollettes - Class 201 - 1956.
          6. "The Big Break" - Richard Berry (With The Crowns) - Flair 1055 - 1954.
          7. "Please Tell Me" - Richard Berry (With Vocal Group) - Flair 1064 - 1955.
          8. "Jelly Roll" - Richard Berry (With Vocal Group) - Flair 1075 - 1955.
          9. "Rock Bottom" - The Rams - Flair 1066 - 1955.
        10. "Sweet Thing" - The Rams - Flair 1066 - 1955.
        11. "Your Feet's Too Big" - Willard McDaniel And His Orchestra - Crown 101 - 1953.
        12. "I'm Waiting For Ships That Never Come In" - Willard McDaniel And His Orchestra - Crown 101 - 1953.
        13. "Your Feet's Too Big" - "Fats" Waller And His Rhythm - Bluebird B-10500-A - 1939.
        14. "Your Feet's Too Big" - Erskine Butterfield And His Blue Boys - Decca 3209 A - 1940.
        15. "The World Is Changing" - The Drifters - Crown 108 - 1954.
        16. "Sacroiliac Swing" - The Drifters - Crown 108 - 1954.
        17. "Waiting All My Life For You" - The Original Jubalaires - Crown 111 - 1954.
        18. "Dreaming Of The Ladies In The Moon" - The Original Jubalaires - Crown 111 - 1954.
        19. "Little Church Of Capistrano" - The Original Jubalaires - Crown 118 - 1954.
        20. "You Won't Let Me Go" - The Original Jubalaires - Crown 118 - 1954.
        21. "I've Waited All My Life For You" - The Jubalaires - Queen 4166-B - 1947.
        22. "I've Waited All My Life For You" - Orville Brooks (And The Jubalaires) - Coral 65000 B - 1948.
        23. "You Won't Let Me Go" - Hadda Brooks Trio - Modern Music 146A - 1946.
        24. "You Won't Let Me Go" - The Four Dots - Dot 1043 - 1951.
        25. "Love Me" - Kay Brown (With Vocal Group) - Crown 127 - 1954.
        26. "Love Me" - Willy & Ruth - Spark 105 - 1954.
        27. "Love Me" - The Woodside Sisters (With The Harptones) - "X" X-0049 - 1954.
        28. "Love Me" - Billy Eckstine - M-G-M 11855 - 1954.
        29. "Love Me" - Georgia Gibbs (With Vocal Group) - Mercury 70473 - 1954.
        30. "Mambo Baby " - Georgia Gibbs (With Vocal Group) - Mercury 70473 - 1954.
        31. "Mambo Baby " - Ruth Brown And Her Rhythmakers - Atlantic 1044 - 1954.
        32. "I Believe" - Elmore James - Meteor 5000 - 1952.
        33. "I Held My Baby Last Night" - Elmore James - Meteor 5000 - 1952.
        34. "Baby What's Wrong" - Elmore James - Meteor 5003 - 1953.
        35. "Sinful Woman" - Elmore James - Meteor 5003 - 1953.
        36. "Dumb Woman Blues" - J. T. (Big Boy) Brown With Elmo James Broom Dusters - Meteor 5016 - 1954.
        37. "Sax-Ony Boogie" - Sax Man Brown With Elmo James Broom Dusters - Meteor 5016 - 1954.
        38. "Early In The Morning" - Elmore James And The Broom Dusters - Flair 1011 - 1953.
        39. "Make A Little Love" - Elmore James And His Broom Dusters - Flair 1014 - 1953.
        40. "You Know I Go For You" - B. B. King - Kent 301 - 1958.
        41. "Why Do Everything Happen To Me" - B. B. King - Kent 301 - 1958.
 
          ALL FORTY-ONE ABOVE SONGS played in sequence.

          ALL TWENTY-SEVEN ABOVE BIHARI-OWNED LABEL SONGS played in sequence.


PREVIOUS ARTICLES!


Back to Main Page

Last Update: January 11, 2023

E-mail Me: