#954 (11/16/23)

JUBILEE RECORDS - PART TWO

BY TONY FOURNIER




JERRY BLAINE (President and owner of Jubilee Records)

WILLIAMSBURG NEWS, August 30, 1957:
Ten years ago a former orchestra leader named Jerry Blaine withdrew $600 from his bank account, rented a tiny store on Tenth Avenue in Manhattan, and ventured into one of the toughest forms of show business, the recording industry. Just a few short months before, he had quit a $25,000-a-year position to become a distributor for other recording companies.

His dealings with the record firms whetted his appetite to the extent that he waded into the business in full sail and set up Jubilee Records in the store on Tenth Avenue. He was entering a field in which others had skinned their knuckles and in which small record companies fell by the wayside in untold numbers.

But Jerry Blaine invaded the business with two factors in his favor: his dynamic salesmanship, and his love of music. Both have paid off handsomely, for today Jubilee Records is one of the nation's leading independent recording companies.

Jubilee's beginnings were far from impressive, for Jerry had to start as a one-man organization. He served as president, sales manager, Artists & Repertoire man, shipping clerk, and delivery boy.

Less than a month later Jerry came out on the market with his first release, and the fledging company had its first hit. It was a Yiddish novelty tune called "Essen", and half a million records were sold.

"Essen" was the first in a long string of smash hits for Jubilee and, during the past ten years, Jerry has produced such well-remembered platters as "Crying in the Chapel" by The Orioles, "Marie" and "I Understand" by The Four Tunes, "Still of the Night" by Della Reese ["In The Still Of The Night, the Cole Porter song.], "Two Different Worlds" and "White Silver Sands" by Don Rondo, and scores of others.

In its ten years, Jubilee has released close to 300 single records and almost 100 albums. As a measure of success, the figures reveal that Jubilee grossed $160,000 in its first year; this year Blaine anticipates that the gross will top $6,000,000. The one-man company in that Tenth Avenue store has grown to a business employing a staff of 27 and located in a building owned by Blaine....

(NOTE: Jubilee, at the time of this article, had already released almost 300 singles in just it's 5000 series alone.)

Today Jerry Blaine, who braved the scoffs and sneers of those who advised him against forming Jubilee Records [How is it they never mention names?], is one of the most successful men in the recording industry.

He owns a $125,000 home in Manhasset, L.I., complete with servants and swimming pool, wears made-to-order clothes, belongs to a swank country club, and is sitting right on top of the world in the business he loves.

At Left: Jerry Blaine looks rather pleased in this 1953 picture.

At Right: CASH BOX, May 15, 1952.


Above: NEW YORK AGE, March 4, 1950.
NOTE: The above was prepared by Jubilee Records' press agent, no doubt.

THE SULTANS
Above Left: Label image for Jubilee 5054, released in March 1951.

Above Right: Label image for Jubilee 5077, recorded in same session as Jubilee 5054, but not released until March 1952. The Sultans had just these two records, both on Jubilee (1951-1952). This label states "Vocal Quartette", but they were actually a quintet on both records.

CASH BOX, April 21, 1951:
....Jerry Blaine, who made a big thing of the Orioles, has another group which heís touting, the Sultans....

Cash Box Review (4/28/51):
THE SULTANS "You Captured My Heart"/"Lemon Squeezing Daddy" Jubilee 5054
A new vocal group shows what it can do with two different types of numbers. The top deck is a slow thing on which the boys go to town with some good small instrumental backing, while the second side is a jumpy piece with a beat on which some fine harmony is shown off. Ops shouldnít miss this group.

FROM PAM & CHARLIE HORNER (May 2008):

Clyde Wright was from the Charlotte, NC, area. His first group was the Golden Bell Quintet. As a teenager, Clyde played guitar on the groupís 1945 RCA-Victor recording (#20-1939), but did not sing on it. Later, he sang in the group live on radio station WBT (Charlotte) along with his cousin, Napoleon "Nappy" Brown.

Thermon Ruth went to Charlotte to recruit Clyde Wright for the Selah Jubilee Singers in 1948. Wright agreed to join the Selahs, but insisted that Ruth also hire his cousin Napoleon Brown. At that time, the Selah Jubilee Singers then consisted of Thermon Ruth, Allen Bunn, Jimmy Gorham, Melvin Coldten, Junius Parker, Clyde Wright, and Napoleon Brown.

After a short while, Ruth and Bunn left to form the Jubilators, who also included Raymond Barnes, Hadie Rowe, Jr., and David McNeil. It was this group that soon acquired Eugene Mumford and eventually became the Larks on Apollo.

Meanwhile, the Selah Jubilee Singers, now consisting of Wright, Brown, Gorham, Coldten, and Parker, went to New York City and recorded for Jubilee records. Two records were released [Jubilee # 3002 Ė "Down Here Iíve Done My Best" (written by Nappy Brown) b/w "Why Not Today" (written by Clyde Wright) and Jubilee #3003 Ė "Since Motherís Been Gone" (written by Parker) b/w "Sorrow Valley".] Nappy Brown does lead on "Down Here Iíve Done My Best" and "Why Not Today". Clyde Wright leads on "Since Motherís Been Gone".

At this point, Napoleon Brown left the group and was replaced by someone remembered only as Clarence. The group continued recording for Jubilee, but now did some secular tunes under the name the Sultans. The Sultans were Clyde Wright, Jimmy Gorham, Melvin Coldten, Junius Parker, and Clarence ???.

Clyde Wright wrote "Donít Be Angry". Clyde went into the army and was not aware the Sultansí records were ever released until years later when Charlie Horner asked him about the records. The group must have been rehearsing "Donít Be Angry" before Nappy Brown left, because he speeded the tune up and recorded it for Savoy in 1955, resulting in a hit record (#2 on R&B Charts, #25 on Pop Charts). When Nappy Brownís version came out it did not credit Clyde Wright as writer. Clyde considered suing but didnít because Nappy was his cousin.

At Direct Right: 1955 photo of Clyde Wright. [Photo courtesy of Paul Ressler.]

At Far Right: CASH BOX, July 14, 1951.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "You Captured My Heart" - The Sultans - Jubilee 5054 - 1951.
2. "Lemon Squeezing Daddy" - The Sultans - Jubilee 5054 - 1951.
3. "Don't Be Angry" - The Sultans - Jubilee 5077 - 1952.
4. "Blues At Dawn" - The Sultans - Jubilee 5077 - 1952.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


CASH BOX — MARCH 15, 1952


EXTRA RECORD — NAPPY BROWN

Above Left: Nappy Brown, from Charlotte, North Carolina, was a rhythm and blues vocalist and pianist. He joined Savoy Records in 1954, providing them with several hit records in the mid-1950s.

Above Middle: Label image for Savoy 1155 A, recorded in February 1955 and released circa March 1955.

BMI.com credits Napoleon Brown Culp and Rose Marie McCoy as the composers of this song. They made the song uptempo and changed much of the words around, but it was clearly taken from The Sultans' original version.

Rose Marie McCoy was a prolific songwriter with 859 work titles registered at BMI.com, including "I Beg Of You" (Elvis Presley), "If I May" (Nat King Cole And The Four Knights), "Doggone It, You Did It" (The Five Keys), "Somebody Somewhere" (Faye Adams), "Stop Cryin'" (Little Esther), and "Mambo Baby" (Ruth Brown).

Above Right: THE BILLBOARD, April 9, 1955.
NOTE: The ad inaccurately claims that Nappy Brown's version of the song is "THE FIRST! THE ORIGINAL!".
In fairness, Savoy most likely didn't know differently.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): "Don't Be Angry" - Nappy Brown - Savoy 1155 A - 1955.


CASH BOX AWARD O' THE WEEK — MARCH 19, 1955



THE ENCHANTERS

Above: Photo of The Enchanters, (Top L-R) Frances Kelley (bass), Pearl Brice (alto), (Bottom L-R) Rachel Gist (soprano), and Della Simpson (lead). They were an all female quartet from Queens, New York, featuring the lead voice of Della Simpson.

Click HERE for an article about The Enchanters/Delltones by Marv Goldberg. (Will open in a separate window)

Above Left: Label image for Jubilee 5072, released in January 1952. The bridge talking part in "Today Is Your Birthday" is performed by Buddy Lucas, the orchestra leader. The Enchanters' version of this song is a cover of The Sugar Tones' 1951 record on the Onyx label.

Above Right: Label image for Jubilee 5080, released in April 1952. The Enchanters had just these two records, both of them on Jubilee (1952).

Cash Box Review (4/26/52):
THE ENCHANTERS "Housewife Blues"/"I've Lost" Jubilee 5080
A fast moving tune is taken through its paces by the Enchanters. An ok set of lyrics and a solid melody are chanted with zest by the quartette, who are backed in polished style by Buddy Lucas and his Band Of Tomorrow. The under lid is a slow item capably sung by the harmonizing group. Ops would do well to take a listen.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Today Is Your Birthday" - The Enchanters - Jubilee 5072 - 1952.
2. "How Could You (Break My Heart)" - The Enchanters - Jubilee 5072 - 1952.
3. "Housewife Blues" - The Enchanters - Jubilee 5080 - 1952.
4. "I've Lost" - The Enchanters - Jubilee 5080 - 1952.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


CASH BOX — JANUARY 12, 1952


CASH BOX — FEBRUARY 9, 1952


EXTRA RECORDS — THE SUGAR TONES & THE FOUR BLADES

Above Left: Jane Taylor And The Sugar Tones from 1952. [Picture courtesy of Marv Goldberg.]

Above Right: Label image for Onyx O-2007, released in September 1951. This is the original version of "Today Is Your Birthday". The Sugar Tones re-recorded the song in April 1952 for the OKeh label. Between 1951 and 1954, they cut at least seven singles for the Onyx, OKeh, and Benida labels.

Per Disco-File, group members on "Today Is Your Birthday" are Jane Taylor, Nathaniel Casey, William "Luke" Luther, and Tommy Quick.

Click HERE for an article about The Sugar Tones by Marv Goldberg. (Will open in a separate window)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): "Today Is Your Birthday" - The Sugar Tones - Onyx O-2007 - 1951.

Above Label images for both sides of Alert 422, released in September 1951. Disco-File gives the group members as Mitch Mitchell, Nathaniel Casey, William "Luke" Luther, and Tommy Quick. This is the same line-up as The Sugar Tones, except Jane Taylor replaced Mitch Mitchell.

The Four Blades had two records on the Alert label released consecutively in 1948.

Alert Records, Inc., located in Brooklyn, NY, existed from 1946 to 1950. It was owned and operated by Solly Abrams. There was a 200 series (jazz), 400 series (blues) and 600 series (spirituals). Some of its featured artists were Avery Parrish, Brownie McGhee, Dud Bascomb, Champion Jack Dupree, and The Four Blades.

In 1948, Alert started a children's records line on their Kiddie Time label, which was sold to Jubilee Records in 1949.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "You Didn't Sign Your Letter With Love" - The Four Blades - Alert 422 A - 1948.
2. "Bake That Chicken Pie" - The Four Blades - Alert 422 B - 1948.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


EXTRA RECORD — THE DELLTONES

After their Jubilee records were released, The Enchanters began to split up. Della Simpson and Frances Kelley found two replacements, and, taking Della's first name, they began recording as The Delltones/Dell Tones for Brunswick (1953), Rainbow (1954), and Baton (1955-1956).

Above Left: 1953 photo of The Delltones, (Top) Della Simpson, (Bottom L-R) Gloria Alleyne, Sherry Gary, and Frances Kelley. [Photo courtesy of Jean-Christophe Piazza.]

FROM GILLES PÉTARD: Gloria Alleyne, of the Delltones, later became a big star and recorded forty albums during forty years as Gloria Lynn.

Above Right: NEW YORK AGE, December 31, 1955.


Above: Label image for Baton 212, released in July 1955.

Co-composers of "Don't Be Long" are Rudy Toombs and Herb Leighton. Toombs was a prolific rhythm and blues songwriter. Among his hit songs are Ruth Brown's "5-10-15", "Daddy Daddy", and "Teardrops From My Eyes", Amos Milburn's "One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer", and The Clovers' "One Mint Julip". BMI.com credits Toombs with 309 work titles.

At Direct Left: BUFFALO EVENING NEWS, November 16, 1956.




Above: 1953 photo of The Delltones, (Top L-R) Gloria Alleyne, Frances Kelley, Sherry Gary, and (Bottom) Della Simpson.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Don't Be Long" - The Delltones - Baton 212 - 1955.
2. "Baby, Say You Love Me" - The Delltones - Baton 212 - 1955.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.




CASH BOX, July 2, 1955:
....Sol Rabinowitz and Lou Sprung [Baton Records executives], who have turned out some mighty tasty material, claim to have the best yet in their coming release by The Delltones. Group was just signed, cut a record, and the release is ready for immediate issue....

THE BILLBOARD, July 16, 1955:
....Della Simpson, Baton Records vocalist, has formed her own group, the Delltones.... The group's first coupling is "Don't Be Long" and "Baby, Say You Love Me".

Cash Box Review (8/27/55):

THE DELLTONES — Baton 212
Baby, Say You Love Me (B) The Delltones blend potently on a rocking item with romantic lyrics. It is a powerful entry that the kids will love and one which gets the new group off to a quick rise. Good fem lead.
Don't Be Long (B) Smooth melodic ballad blues effectively chanted by the Delltones. Tune has a drive that carries right through. Two good sides.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good".)

EDNA McGRIFF

Above: Photo of Edna McGriff, who was a singer and songwriter. With the success of fifteen-year-old Little Esther at Savoy Records, Jerry Blaine, president of Jubilee Records, surely was looking for a similar talent. Edna, who was almost exactly Esther's age, fit the bill perfectly.

Edna had a total of ten records released on Jubilee (1951-1953), two of which are duets with Sonny Til. She also had one record on Jubilee's subsidiary label, Josie (1954). Her big hit was her second record on Jubilee, "Heavenly Father", issued in 1952.

Click HERE for an article about Edna McGriff by Marv Goldberg. (Will open in a separate window)

Above Left: Label image for Jubilee 5062, released in August 1951. This is Edna McGriff's first record. BMI.com lists over 1,000 songs titled "Come Back". BMI credits "Edna McGriff" and "Jack Kenneth Walker" as composers of the songs on both sides of this record. Walker was a New York City disk jockey, who became Edna's mentor.

Above Right: Label image for Jubilee 5073, released in February 1952. This is Edna's second record. The label for the flip-side, "I Love You", shows "Walker - Lucas - McGriff" as the composers. BMI.com credits only Buddy Lucas and Edna McGriff. In 1957, Jubilee revived the song "Heavenly Father" with a version by Bill Darnell.

At Direct Right: CASH BOX, April 5, 1952.

At Far Right: Photo of Edna McGriff.

Cash Box Review (3/8/52):
EDNA McGRIFF & BUDDY LUCAS "Heavenly Father"/"I Love You" Jubilee 5073
A slow ballad is waxed impressively by Edna McGriff as she doles out her own tune, "Heavenly Father". Title might lead one to believe the song is a religious number, but, while it is in a way, it is certainly given a new twist in its treatment.

Lyrics are timely, and Buddy Lucas and his Band of Tomorrow provide a soothing backdrop as they offer their dramatic arrangement of this slow piece. The artists plus the material bring in a waxing that will get a big share of the juke box play.

Second side is a slow blues that Edna McGriff and Buddy Lucas deliver in their slick style resulting in a pleasant dish. The upper lid is loaded with possibilities and ops should take a peek.

CASH BOX, October 18, 1952:
....(Edna McGriff) has been working with The Orioles and the Paul Williams Orchestra. Her recent appearance at NYCís Apollo was her first big city date, tho she is well known around the R&B routes....

BUFFALO COURIER EXPRESS, October 26, 1952:
....The pert, bright-eyed little Negro girl edged her way quakingly into the office of Jerry Blaine, well-known New York record distributor. She held out a piece of cheap foolscap [legal-size, lined paper] on which were written the words to a song she had composed.

"I can sing it, too," she explained, shifting from one foot to the other. Blaine dutifully read the lyrics. "Well, now," he said kindly, "you go right ahead and sing."

That was how "Heavenly Father", sung by 16-year-old Edna McGriff, came to be recorded. Edna now makes $750 a week for singing engagements when she's not going to high School.

(NOTE: Will leave it up to you to buy into that story or not.)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Come Back" - Edna McGriff - Jubilee 5062 - 1951.
2. "Note Droppin' Papa" - Edna McGriff - Jubilee 5062 - 1951.
3. "Heavenly Father" - Edna McGriff - Jubilee 5073 - 1952.
4. "I Love You" - Edna McGriff - Jubilee 5073 - 1952.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.

JUBILEE RECORDS HEAVILY PROMOTED "HEAVENLY FATHER":


CASH BOX — MARCH 29, 1952


CASH BOX — May 3, 1952

CASH BOX — May 31, 1952



THE MARYLANDERS

The Marylanders, from Baltimore, consisted of Lewis "Buster" Banks (lead tenor), Henry Abrams (bass), David Jones (baritone), and Johnny Paige (second tenor). Their guitarist was Tommy Bonds. That is their line-up for the four sides featured here,

Click HERE for an article about The Marylanders by Marv Goldberg. (Will open in a separate window)

Above Left: Label image for Jubilee 5079, released in April 1952. This is the first of three records by The Marylanders on the Jubilee label (1952-1953).

Buster Banks sings lead on the shown side, while Johnny Paige has the honor on the flip-side, "Sittin' By The River". See picture of them at far lower right. "Sittin'" is an unusual and rather gloomy song about the singer's upcoming death.

Above Right: Label image for Jubilee 5091, released in August 1952. Here, Buster Banks sings lead on both sides. Bill Robertson and Homer Murray, the group's designated song writers, composed all four of the sides featured here. Don't know how Samuel Matz got his name in the "Make Me Thrill Again" composer credits.

At Direct Right: CASH BOX, June 21, 1952.

TRADE MAGAZINE, May 1952:
....New Orleans jockey Ken Elliot (WWEZ) spun the Marylanders' "I'm a Sentimental Fool" on Jubilee and the sparks haven't stopped flying yet. Elliot started getting calls from his listeners and other deejays, with the result that Ken had to lend his plate (the only one in town) to five other jocks for their programs. Distribs from that city have placed orders for several thousand disks and Jerry Blaine is soaring high in the clouds....

TRADE MAGAZINE, June 1952:
...."I'm a Sentimental Fool" is starting to build on the Jubilee label with the new group, the Marylanders. We hear one of the top recording names on a major label is interested and that several other majors are planning to cut it....

CASH BOX, September 6, 1952:
....Jerry Blaine excited over the reception given to the new Marylanders release "Make Me Thrill Again" and "Please Love Me"....

Cash Box Sleeper Of The Week (9/6/52):
THE MARYLANDERS "Make Me Thrill Again "/"Please Love Me " Jubilee 5091
The Marylanders take the slow beat "Make Me Thrill Again" and treat it to a novel bit of singing with the result that the foursome has an exciting side that means money in the boxes. With the Buddy Lucas ork supplying the musical lift, the etching has a blend of vocal and instruments that really makes this a sock deck.

The other side is a similar beat, titled "Please Love Me" and is capably sung by the stylish Marylanders and arranged in a manner fashioned to please.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "I'm A Sentimental Fool" - The Marylanders - Jubilee 5079 - 1952.
2. "Sittin' By The River" - The Marylanders - Jubilee 5079 - 1952.
3. "Make Me Thrill Again" - The Marylanders - Jubilee 5091 - 1952.
4. "Please Love Me" - The Marylanders - Jubilee 5091 - 1952.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.

Above: Two members of The Marylanders circa 1955.
(Top) Buster Banks and (Bottom) Johnny Paige.













CASH BOX AWARD O' THE WEEK — June 7, 1952


Above Left: Jubilee Ad - June 1952.

Above Right Top: CASH BOX, May 31, 1952.

Above Right Bottom: CASH BOX, September 6, 1952.



SONNY TIL & EDNA McGRIFF

SONNY TIL

EDNA McGRIFF

Above Left: Label image for Jubilee 5076, released in March 1952.

Above Right: Label image for Jubilee 5099, released in October 1952.

At Direct Right: CASH BOX, November 29, 1952.

Cash Box Review (5/17/52):
SUNNY TIL "Proud Of You "/"You Never Cared For Me" Jubilee 5076
Sunny Til gives a soft and mellow treatment to a slow ballad. Sunnyís easy vocalizing of the sentimental lyrics receives the able support of Buddy Lucas and his ork. The disking is easy on the ears.

Flip is another slow piece that Til projects with feeling and warmth. Sunnyís effortless and smooth singing of the pretty oldie is musically backed on this side by the Lee Lovett Ork.
(NOTE: The incorrect spelling of Sonny's name on the record label has carried over into the review.)

CASH BOX, November 1, 1952:
Jubilee Records have been moving fabulously in the R&B field, and with the issuance of its latest releases, has announced that with eight disks currently so hot, the diskery will issue no other records until after the first of the year.

Jerry Blaine has one in the newest batch that will certainly strengthen his front line of best sellers. The new Edna McGriff-Sonny Til waxing of "Good" backed with "Piccadilly" is a double sock that will do much for the reputation of the sixteen-year old thrush, and the lead vocalist of the Orioles. The pair work together like butter and bread.

Cash Box Review (11/1/52):

EDNA McGRIFF & — SONNY TIL, JUBILEE 5099....
Piccadilly (B+) That wonderful blending of talent, Edna McGriff and Sonny Til on the vocal, and Buddy Lucas with the baton, get together on a medium beat bounce with happy novelty lyrics and the result is a sock side.
Good (B+) The same trio dish up a quick tempo jump in the same grand manner and come up with what might be termed an even better side than the upper deck. McGriff has an amazingly mature style and voice for a sixteen year old. Supplemented by Til and Lucas, this is a sure fire money grabber for the boxes.
(NOTE: A rating of B+ was considered as "excellent".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Proud Of You" - Sonny Til - Jubilee 5076 - 1952.
2. "You Never Cared For Me" - Sonny Til - Jubilee 5076 - 1952.
3. "Piccadilly" - Edna McGriff & Sonny Til - Jubilee 5099 - 1952.
4. "Good" - Edna McGriff & Sonny Til - Jubilee 5099 - 1952.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.



LITTLE SYLVIA

Above: Photos of Little Sylvia aka Sylvia Vanderpool and Sylvia Robinson. In 1950, as Sylvia Vanderpool, she recorded for the Columbia label. She then began recording as "Little Sylvia" for Savoy and Jubilee. She was the "Sylvia" in "Mickey And Sylvia" (with Mickey Baker), resulting in their number one rhythm and blues record, "Love Is Strange", in 1957. As Sylvia Robinson, she was a co-founder of the hip-hop label "Sugar Hill" in 1979.

Little Sylvia started her recording career, at fifteen-years-old, with two records, one side each, on the Columbia label (1950), both backed by The Magichords. She then went to Savoy Records, resulting in two releases (1951). Following that, she had three records released on the Jubilee label (1952-1953).

Above Left: Label image for Jubilee 5100. The record was released in October 1952. "Jubilee Music" seems to be Jubilee's ASCAP publishing company. Most of the Jubilee labels for BMI songs, at least up to this point, do not show a publisher.

Above Right: Label image for Jubilee 5113. The record was released in March 1953.

At Left: CASH BOX, November 8, 1952.
NOTE: Sylvia was 17 years old at the time of this ad.

Above: CASH BOX DISK OF THE WEEK: November 1, 1952.




CASH BOX, September 6, 1952:
....Jubilee Records has signed Little Sylvia, formerly with Savoy Records. The thrush's first release on the label is "I Went To Your Wedding"....

At Right: Photo of Buddy Lucas, whose orchestra was Jubilee's "house band" in the early 1950s.

The Billboard Review (11/15/52):

LITTLE SYLVIA — JUBILEE 5100....
A Million Tears
(75) The thrush has a powerful item here in this attractive new weeper ballad. Tune is pretty and the thrush hands it a good rendition, helped by smooth ork backing. Tune could stir action if exploited.
Don't Blame My Heart (70) Little Sylvia does a warm job with this ballad, but the flip carries all the excitement.
(NOTE: A ratings range of 70-79 was considered "good.")

Cash Box Review (3/21/53):

LITTLE SYLVIA — JUBILEE 5113....
The Ring (B) The soft haziness of Little Sylviaís voice comes off in good form as the thrush does a sparkling job on a folk flavored ballad. The job is enhanced by an organ and guitar backdrop.
Blue Heaven (C+) The young thrush has a tear in her voice as she hands up a sentimental item in her caressing manner. This talented performer has a brilliant future that could begin with the top half.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good" and C+ as "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "A Million Tears" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5100 - 1952.
2. "Don't Blame My Heart" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5100 - 1952.
3. "The Ring" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5113 - 1953.
4. "Blue Heaven" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5113 - 1953.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.



Above Left: CASH BOX, April 11, 1953.
NOTE: Includes an indirect reference to the now defunct "It's A Natural" label.

Above Right Top: CASH BOX, November 22, 1952.

Above Right Bottom: CASH BOX, March 28, 1953.


EXTRA RECORD — A MILLION TEARS (THE FOUR KNIGHTS)

Above Left: Label image for Capitol 2315, released in December 1952.

Above Right: THE BILLBOARD, February 21, 1953.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"A Million Tears" - The Four Knights - Capitol 2315 - 1952.


EXTRA RECORD — THE RING (LINDA SHANNON)

Above Left: Picture of Linda Shannon taken from the Chicago Tribune dated November 8, 1953.

Linda, a 21-year-old singer from New York City, had three records on the King label, all in 1953. From King, she moved to Jubilee Records, where she had at least one record, that in 1954.

Above Right: BUFFALO COURIER EXPRESS, March 8, 1953.

Above Left: Label image for King 1211, released in April 1953.

Above Right: CHICAGO TRIBUNE, October 25, 1953.

THE BILLBOARD, May 9, 1953: GOLD RINGS FOR DEEJAYS
Gold wedding bands are being sent out to deejays by George Wiener, of Winar Music, to focus attention on the firm's new ditty, "The Ring". The tune has been cut by Linda Shannon on King and by Little Sylvia on Jubilee.

At Near Right: COLUMBIA RECORD, April 28, 1955. (Linda Shannon)

At Far Right: AKRON BEACON, July 12, 1953. (Linda Shannon)

Cash Box Review (5/16/53):

LINDA SHANNON — KING 1211....
The Ring (B) A very attractive melody is given a heart-felt presentation by the well controlled voice of Linda Shannon. She has a beautiful tender quality that comes over fine on wax. Folk flavored tune could catch many coins.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good".)

The Billboard Review (5/16/53):

LINDA SHANNON — KING 1211....
The Ring (72)
Miss Shannon does nicely with a weeper ballad.
(NOTE: A ratings range of 70-79 was considered "good.")

DETROIT FREE PRESS, July 21, 1953:
....Once an usherette at New York's Paramount Theater, vocalist Linda Shannon is headlining the new show at Club Gay Haven. Her break into show business came through cutting demonstration records for song writers....

THE BILLBOARD, May 1, 1954:
....Linda Shannon, formerly on King Records, has been signed by Jubilee Records....

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"The Ring" - Linda Shannon - King 1211 - 1953.



THE FIVE SHARPS

Above: 1953 photo of The Five Sharps, (L-R Around Microphone) Clarence Bassett (first tenor), Bobby Ward (second tenor), Ronald Cuffey (lead tenor), and Mickey Owens (bass). The fifth member, Tommy Duckett (baritone), is playing the piano (not shown in the picture).

Click HERE for an article about The Five Sharps by Marv Goldberg. (Will open in a separate window)

Above Left: Label image for Jubilee 5104, recorded in October 1952 and released in December 1952. Ronald Cuffey sings lead on both sides. This was their only record, one of the rarest and most sought after in the history of r&b vocal groups. See Marv's article for the astonishing history of this record.

Above Right: 1974 photo of Tommy Duckett, who was the group's baritone and pianist. He's not shown in the further above photo of the group.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Stormy Weather" - The Five Sharps - Jubilee 5104 - 1952.
2. "Sleepy Cowboy" - The Five Sharps - Jubilee 5104 - 1952.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


ANDREW WIDEMAN
Above: JET MAGAZINE, April 23, 1953:
Signs Recording Pact. Andrew Wideman, 12, who rose from obscurity in the last six months to become a sensational piano playing and blues singing star of the variety show "Star Time Kids", is signed to a long-term recording contract by Jerry Blaine of Jubilee Records. George Scheck (left), producer of the show, discovered Wideman.
Above Left: Label image for Jubilee 5117, released in April 1953. Andrew Wideman had one more record on Jubilee. That one, Jubilee 5126, received "B" ratings (very good) for both sides from Cash Box.

Above Right: CASH BOX, May 16, 1953.

At Direct Right: THE BILLBOARD, June 13, 1953.

CASH BOX, May 2, 1953:
....Sensational youngster, Andrew Wideman, 12 year old piano blues singer featured on "Star Time", NBC-TV, comes out with his first release on Jubilee Records. "Iím Not A Child Anymore" backed with "Mamaís Little Boy Got The Blues". Jubilee reports the first exposure on the air was followed by a rash of orders and the brass is excited about its hit potential....

THE BILLBOARD, May 9, 1953:
....Andrew Wideman, 12-year-old singing star of NBC's "Star Time" starts at the Apollo Theater, New York, May 15....

CASH BOX, May 16, 1953:
....If it's action you want, drop in on the Blaines. What with all the hits they are distributing, and their own Jubilee Record Company, it is one beehive of activity. The Andrew Wideman etching "Mamaís Little Boy Got The Blues" is racking up heavy sales and Jubilee looks like it possesses a mighty valuable piece of property....

Cash Box Review (5/9/53):

ANDREW WIDEMAN — Jubilee 5117
I'm Not A Child Anymore (C+) Andrew Wideman, one of the top artists from TVís "Star Time," comes up with a stylish reading of a bluesy ballad. He has a load of feeling in his voice.
Mama's Little Boy Got The Blues (B+) The 12 year old youngster does a masterful and mature job of belting out a sock jumper in the blues style. The song and rhythm are terrific. With TV publicity and wonderful reading, this might happen.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good" and C+ as "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "I'm Not A Child Anymore" - Andrew Wideman - Jubilee 5117 - 1953.
2. "Mama's Little Boy Got The Blues" - Andrew Wideman - Jubilee 5117 - 1953.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

ADDITIONAL RESEARCH BY MARV GOLDBERG (11/22/23):

In the 1950 census, Andrew Wideman is living in Newark with his mother and seven siblings. Two of those are named Salome and Geraldine.

Turns out the actual last name was "Wideman-Bey". That's how his father, Andrew Pierce Wideman-Bey, filled out his WW2 draft registration.

Guess what? With Salome and Geraldine, he ended up as "Andy & The Bey Sisters". He's even in his high school yearbook as Andrew Wideman Bey (see yearbook picture at right).

Above Left: Label image for Jaguar 3016, released in September 1955.
[Label scan and corresponding audio provided by Andrew Bohan.]

This was The Bey Sisters' first record. Another on Jaguar followed soon afterward. Jaguar, formed in 1954, was a New York City label owned by George J. Bennett. He previously owned the Arlington, Bandwagon, Bennett, and Hudson labels, all in the 1940's.

In 1957, songwriters Frank Slay and Bob Crew would compose "Silhouettes" and release it on their own XYZ label by The Rays.

Above Right: Picture of Andy And The Bey Sisters, who consisted of (L-R) Andy, Geraldine, and Salome Bey. Andy is their uncredited brother. They formed in 1955 and continued as a group until 1967. After two releases on Jaguar, another two on Decca, and one on Flip, they changed their name to "Andy And The Bey Sisters".

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Wake Up" - The Bey Sisters - Jaguar 3016 - 1955.
2. "Patience" - The Bey Sisters - Jaguar 3016 - 1955.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.



GENERAL CLIPPINGS — JUBILEE RECORDS

At Far Left: CASH BOX, December 22, 1951.

At Near Left: CASH BOX, July 19, 1952.

Directly Above: THE BILLBOARD, September 13, 1952.



JUBILEE RECORDS - PART ONE FEATURES THE ORIOLES, THE BALLADEERS, CLIFF AYERS, THE MELLO-MOODS, THE MASTER KEYS, VIOLA WATKINS, AND RALPH WILLIS. ALSO INCLUDED IS A SECTION ON JERRY BLAINE, OWNER AND PRESIDENT OF JUBILEE RECORDS.

Listen to all of this article's audio selections using Windows Media Player:

          1. "You Captured My Heart" - The Sultans - Jubilee 5054 - 1951.
          2. "Lemon Squeezing Daddy" - The Sultans - Jubilee 5054 - 1951.
          3. "Don't Be Angry" - The Sultans - Jubilee 5077 - 1952.
          4. "Blues At Dawn" - The Sultans - Jubilee 5077 - 1952.
          5. "Don't Be Angry" - Nappy Brown - Savoy 1155 A - 1955.
          6. "Today Is Your Birthday" - The Enchanters - Jubilee 5072 - 1952.
          7. "How Could You (Break My Heart)" - The Enchanters - Jubilee 5072 - 1952.
          8. "Housewife Blues" - The Enchanters - Jubilee 5080 - 1952.
          9. "I've Lost" - The Enchanters - Jubilee 5080 - 1952.
        10. "Today Is Your Birthday" - The Sugar Tones - Onyx O-2007 - 1951.
        11. "You Didn't Sign Your Letter With Love" - The Four Blades - Alert 422 A - 1948.
        12. "Bake That Chicken Pie" - The Four Blades - Alert 422 B - 1948.
        13. "Don't Be Long" - The Delltones - Baton 212 - 1955.
        14. "Baby, Say You Love Me" - The Delltones - Baton 212 - 1955.
        15. "Come Back" - Edna McGriff - Jubilee 5062 - 1951.
        16. "Note Droppin' Papa" - Edna McGriff - Jubilee 5062 - 1951.
        17. "Heavenly Father" - Edna McGriff - Jubilee 5073 - 1952.
        18. "I Love You" - Edna McGriff - Jubilee 5073 - 1952.
        19. "I'm A Sentimental Fool" - The Marylanders - Jubilee 5079 - 1952.
        20. "Sittin' By The River" - The Marylanders - Jubilee 5079 - 1952.
        21. "Make Me Thrill Again" - The Marylanders - Jubilee 5091 - 1952.
        22. "Please Love Me" - The Marylanders - Jubilee 5091 - 1952.
        23. "Proud Of You" - Sonny Til - Jubilee 5076 - 1952.
        24. "You Never Cared For Me" - Sonny Til - Jubilee 5076 - 1952.
        25. "Piccadilly" - Edna McGriff & Sonny Til - Jubilee 5099 - 1952.
        26. "Good" - Edna McGriff & Sonny Til - Jubilee 5099 - 1952.
        27. "A Million Tears" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5100 - 1952.
        28. "Don't Blame My Heart" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5100 - 1952.
        29. "The Ring" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5113 - 1953.
        30. "Blue Heaven" - Little Sylvia - Jubilee 5113 - 1953.
        31. "A Million Tears" - The Four Knights - Capitol 2315 - 1952.
        32. "The Ring" - Linda Shannon - King 1211 - 1953.
        33. "Stormy Weather" - The Five Sharps - Jubilee 5104 - 1952.
        34. "Sleepy Cowboy" - The Five Sharps - Jubilee 5104 - 1952.
        35. "I'm Not A Child Anymore" - Andrew Wideman - Jubilee 5117 - 1953.
        36. "Mama's Little Boy Got The Blues" - Andrew Wideman - Jubilee 5117 - 1953.
 
          ALL THIRTY-SIX ABOVE SONGS played in sequence.

          ALL TWENTY-EIGHT ABOVE JUBILEE LABEL SONGS played in sequence.


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