#944 (1/9/21)

SPOTLIGHT ON LAVERN BAKER - PART ONE (1950-1954)


"I Want A Lavender Cadillac"
by Bea Baker
Maurice King And His Wolverines
on Okeh 6800
released in 1951

"How Long"/"I've Tried"
by Miss Sharecropper
on National 9151
released in 1951

"Take Out Some Time"/"I Want To Rock"
by Miss Sharecropper
on National 9153
released in 1951

"Pig Latin Blues"
by Lavern Baker
Todd Rhodes Orchestra
on King 4566
released in 1952

"Lost Child"
by Laverne Baker
Todd Rhodes Orchestra
on King 4601
released in 1952

"Soul On Fire"/
"How Can You Leave A Man Like This?"
LaVerne Baker
on Atlantic 1004
released in 1953

"I Can't Hold Out Any Longer"/
"I'm Living My Life For You"
LaVern Baker
on Atlantic 1030
released in 1954

(Includes Audio For Twenty-Six Songs - Audio Restored By Dave Saviet - Images Restored By Tony Fournier)



[The above photo courtesy of Paul Ressler. Restored by Tony Fournier.]
Above: LAVERN BAKER, identified as "Little Miss Sharecropper" on this photo. LaVern Baker, from Detroit, was a singer, composer, and entertainer. She recorded under the names Bea Baker, Little Miss Sharecropper, Miss Sharecropper, Laverne Baker, LaVerne Baker, Lavern Baker, and LaVern Baker. She composed songs under the name Delores Williams. Her first two records were released on RCA Victor in 1949 as Little Miss Sharecropper. LaVern had her hit songs on the Atlantic label, including "Tweedle Dee", "Play It Fair", "Still", and "Jim Dandy". She was a contemporary, an Atlantic label mate, and a good friend of the great Ruth Brown*.

(*REF: See Ruth Brown's three-part Record of the Week.)

TAMPA BAY TIMES, May 22, 1949: BLUES
Eddie "Sugarman" Penigar offers two baby songs, "I Wonder Baby" and "Brand New Baby". Little Miss Sharecropper shares the vocals with the sugarman (RCA Victor). (NOTE: LaVern sings on the former, Penigar on the latter song.)

PITTSBURGH COURIER, February 7, 1953: LITTLE MISS SHARECROPPER LOOMS AS STAR MATERIAL
DETROIT—It could be just a coincidence, but cagey Al Green, who recently parlayed a forgotten crooner, Johnnie Ray, and a new song, "Cry", into a tidy profit for everyone concerned, has another sure-fire star in the making, LaVerne Baker, 23, better known as "Little Miss Sharecropper", and you will never guess what this attractive singer's "hottest" record is to date. Why, "Trying", of course.

Green, one of the bosses at the Flame Show Bar, has been exceedingly successful in the acquisition and development of new talent. "The girl is slightly less than sensational", Al reports, "and her records prove it. Right now, she's making a big swing through the South and when she returns, I know she will be ready for the real 'big time'. She's gonna be as great as Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, and any of your top girl singers someday, but she isn't climbing to the top by copying anybody".

Johnnie Ray, after severing business relations with Green, credited "Miss Sharecropper" as being one of two female blues singers who helped him to develop his own successful style.

She inherited the name "Miss Sharecropper" from Freddie Williamson, vice president of ABC, who needed another "Miss Cornshucks". After hearing the talented singer, Williamson decided to send her out on her own as "Miss Sharecropper".

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.] — "Trying" - Lavern Baker - King 4556 - 1952.

Click HERE for an article about Lavern Baker by Marv Goldberg. (Will open in a separate window)


Above: Photos of LaVern Baker (Left) as "Miss Sharecropper" and (Right) as herself. Yes, the "beauty" mark has mysteriously moved.



Above Left: LEXINGTON HERALD (KENTUCKY), July 4, 1950.

Above Right: THE BILLBOARD, April 28, 1951.


EXTRA AUDIO #1 (Windows Media Player): IVORY JOE HUNTER
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

Above Left: Photo of Ivory Joe Hunter, who was a singer, pianist, composer, and band leader. He would become a star artist for the M-G-M and Atlantic labels.

Above Middle: Label image for King 4405-A recorded on June 13, 1941 and released later in 1941. The composer of this song is Beatrice Hunter, Ivory Joe's wife. She wrote many of Ivory Joe's songs.

Above Right: Cropped picture of Ivory Joe Hunter from The Billboard dated March 10, 1951.

BIO FROM THE LABELS: "Ivory Joe Hunter was born in Kirbyville, Texas, October 11, 1911. He attended school in Beaumont. He was born with music in his soul. His entire family are musicians and his two brothers have bands. Joe's first professional job was in a cafe where he would play [the piano] from six in the evening until six in the morning. His first radio show started in 1937 in Beaumont."

ASBURY PARK PRESS, February 19, 1951:
JAZZ FAVORITE — The Juke Box Operators of America in their fifth annual poll of the automatic music industry have voted Ivory Joe Hunter the best jazz blues artist of 1950. Hunter's MGM recording of "I Almost Lost My Mind" took honors as top jazz blues record of 1950.

Also placing high was another MGM platter by the same artist: his recording of "I Need You So". Ivory Joe was born in Texas, son of a guitar-playing father and a spiritual-singing mother. One of 14 children, Joe has three brothers who lead dance bands.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
"Too Late" - Ivory Joe Hunter - King 4405-A - 1950.


Above Left: Label image for National 9151, both sides recorded in November 1950 and the record released in 1951. LaVern Baker composed both of the songs shown above and their flip sides, using the name Delores Williams.

Above Right: Label image for National 9153 recorded in November 1950 and released in 1951. The flip side was recorded in December 1950.

The Cash Box Review (4/21/51):

MISS SHARECROPPER — National 9151....
I've Tried/How Long

Here are a couple of good sides by a singer known as Miss Sharecropper. The top deck is a slow blues number with a low down piano backing. It's slow and very soft. The bottom is a faster blues item with some exciting drums in the background. Ops should listen in.

The Billboard Review (5/5/51):

MISS SHARECROPPER — National 9151....
How Long?
(72) Thrush debuts for National with a catchy jump blues, with combo riffing somewhat heavily in back.
I've Tried (83) Gal registers strong on this slow boogie, impressing with a warm voice quality and feeling. Piano and rhythm put down an ear-catching backing with a steady walking bass figure.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 70-79 was considered "good" and 80-89 was "excellent".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "How Long" - Miss Sharecropper - National 9151 - 1951.
2. "I've Tried" - Miss Sharecropper - National 9151 - 1951.
3. "Take Out Some Time" - Miss Sharecropper - National 9153 - 1951.
4. "I Want To Rock" - Miss Sharecropper - National 9153 - 1951.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


EXTRA AUDIO #2 (Windows Media Player): THE CALYPSO BOYS
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

Above Left: DETROIT FREE PRESS, February 26, 1951.
(NOTE: China Doll was a dancer.)

Above Middle: DETROIT FREE PRESS, March 9, 1951.

Above Right: DETROIT FREE PRESS, March 9, 1951:
....THAT PEPPY recording song star, Little Miss Sharecropper, continues at the Flame Show Bar. The Calypso Boys with China Doll and the song-piano team of Bill Campbell and Baby Dee are also still going strong....

At Far Left: The Calypso Boys — (L-R) Sam Manley, bongo player; Joe Richardson, and Al Wiltshire. Club El Sino was located in Detroit. Looks like each had a hand in writing the inscription.

At Direct Left: Label image for Decca 24448 A recorded on April 23, 1947 and released in 1947.
Here they are singing with Louis Jordan And His Tympany Five.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
"Run Joe" - Louis Jordan And His Tympany Five (With The Calypso Boys) - Decca 24448 A - 1947.



EXTRA AUDIO #3 (Windows Media Player): EUNICE DAVIS
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

Above Left: DETROIT FREE PRESS, May 4, 1951.

Above Right: DETROIT FREE PRESS, January 11, 1952.


Above Left: Picture of Eunice Davis from CALIFORNIA EAGLE dated 1/25/51 (See accompanying article further below.)

Above Middle: Label image for Atlantic 992 released in 1953. The composer on the flip side is "Davis". This is her only record on the Atlantic label.

Above Right: CENTRAL NEW JERSEY HOME NEWS, March 14, 1952.

NEW YORK AGE, April 4, 1953: NEW RECORD CONTRACT
Eunice Davis, one of the nation's up and coming blues singers, signed a five-year contract with Atlantic Recording Company last week and will begin waxing several sides this Thursday. She has also been signed to appear in the new night club revue at Club Hi-De-Ho beginning April 10. (NOTE: Only one record was released.)

THE CASH BOX, April 11, 1953:
....Atlantic Records releases five new disks this week and reaction to Eunice Davis' "Go To Work Pretty Daddy" and "Let's Meet On 125th Street" [sic] indicates another hit. Eunice is new gal on the Atlantic label....

The Cash Box Review (4/18/53):

EUNICE DAVIS — Atlantic 992....
Go To Work Pretty Daddy (B+)
Eunice Davis belts out a quick beat with novelty lyrics that really moves. The gal sings with spirit and appeal as she puts the needle into a malingering husband to "go to work". Side has what today's r&b audience seems to favor and Miss Davis sells it well.
My Beat Is 125th Street (B) Miss Davis has another quick beat in which she sings of the entertainments on 125th Street. The Thrush handles herself well and the etching is more than adequate.

(NOTE: A rating of B+ was considered "excellent" and B "very good".)

At Left: THE CASH BOX, April 11, 1953. (NOTE: It seems that the song title was changed from "Let's Meet On..." to "My Beat Is..." The song's lyrics contain both lines.)

CALIFORNIA EAGLE, January 25, 1951: EUNICE DAVIS NEW SINGING SENSATION
NEW YORK—Harlem's newest blues sensation, lovely Eunice Davis, last week hit the jackpot by being signed to a two-year contract as an exclusive recording artist for Derby Recording Company. Writing lyrics always has been her greatest ambition. Among her compositions was a lucky blues number titled "Rock Little Daddy", which she took to Larry Newton of Derby Recording Company. He liked the number and agreed to wax it with Freddie Mitchell's Band.

On the day of the recording session Freddie Mitchell showed up at the studio minus his vocalist, but time and recording sessions wait for nobody. Prexy Newton of Derby asked Miss Davis to sing the lyrics of her blues "Rock Little Daddy" so that the band could hear the melody. When he heard Eunice Davis sing the lyrics his decision was made. "Here", he said, "is truly an outstanding singer. Eunice Davis must record for us." It now looks as though the talented young lady is headed for success. She just signed a management contract with John Levy, personal manager of Billie Holiday.

DETROIT FREE PRESS, May 4, 1951:
FORMER VOCALIST with "Hot Lips" Page will style blues as Flame Show Bar star beginning Friday evening. Her recording of "Rock Little Daddy" has turned out to be a sensation....

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "My Beat Is 125th St." - Eunice Davis - Atlantic 992 - 1953.
2. "Go To Work Pretty Daddy" - Eunice Davis - Atlantic 992 - 1953.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

(NOTE: EXTRA AUDIO's for The Rockets and the Stick McGhee records are further down on this page.)


Above Left: Label image for Okeh 6800, recorded in May 1951 and released in July 1951. Vocal is by Bea Baker aka LaVern Baker. She is not on the flip side. This is the first record on the recently activated OKeh "Rhythm and Blues" label, a subsidiary of Columbia Records.

Above Middle & Right: ALABAMA TRIBUNE, June 22, 1951.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
"I Want A Lavender Cadillac" - Maurice King And His Wolverines (Vocal By Bea Baker) - OKeh 6800 - 1951.


EXTRA AUDIO #4 (Windows Media Player): JOAN SHAW
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

Above Left: DETROIT TRIBUNE, July 14, 1951.

Above Middle: Photo of Joan Shaw. [This photo courtesy of Paul Ressler.]
Joan Shaw started her career on the M-G-M label (1950-51). Following one Abbey release in late 1951, she moved to Coral (1952-53), to Gem (1953), and then various small labels thereafter.

Above Right: Photo of Hal Singer, who was a saxophonist and orchestra leader.

At Left: Label image for Coral 65086 released in 1952.

THE CASH BOX, May 12, 1951: SHAW SIGNS SHAW
NEW YORK—Joan Shaw, lovely MGM recording artist, after ironing out contract difficulties with MCA, was immediately signed by Shaw Artists Corporation. Ben DeCosta, personal manager for several top rhythm and blues attractions, set the deal and plans to bring several other top names into the Shaw office. Joan just concluded a successful engagement at the Apollo Theatre. (NOTE: Music Corporation Of America was another talent agency.)

The Cash Box Review" (5/10/52):

HAL SINGER ORCHESTRA & JOAN SHAW — Coral 65086....
Lonesome And Blue/I Love The Way You Love Me

Hal Singer and his orchestra and chirp Joan Shaw collaborate on another Benjamin and Weiss number and sock out a forceful half. The ork provides a fitting backdrop for the songstress as she tries her hand at the multiple voice gimmick. Flip finds Joan with a blues item that she delivers with a torch rendition. The upper end is stronger.

(Joan Shaw - 1951)
"Lonesome And Blue" was composed by the dynamic duo, Bennie Benjamin and George Weiss", who also wrote such songs as "Wheel Of Fortune" (Cardinals, Four Flames), "Rumors Are Flying" (Brown Dots), "I Want To Thank Your Folks" (Ink Spots), "Cross Over The Bridge" (Flamingos, Chords), "Can Anyone Explain?" (Savannah Churchill And Striders), and "When The Lights Go On Again" (Herb Kenny And Comets).

Benjamin and Weiss recorded as "The Two Tones" (possibly referring to their different skin colors) on Cosmo and "The Soft Notes" on Mercury. The Mercury sides have vocal group backing to the duo's lead singing.

TRADE MAGAZINE, May 1950:
....You may soon be hearing big things from a new chirp, Joan Shaw, who's just penned her name to an M-G-M disk contract. Gal was brought in from a Miami, Fla., nitespot and signed to a management pact by Irv Brabeck of MCA. Joan has what it takes to score, being just a shade between Kay Starr and Sarah Vaughan, and that's going plenty right for her....

TRADE MAGAZINE, April 1953:
....Jack Bergman, head of Tempo Distributors and Discovery Records, has pacted thrush Joan Shaw and last week cut six original tunes for his r.&b. label. Ben DeCosta, Miss Shaw's manager, reportedly handled the session....
(NOTE: There were three Joan Shaw records in 1953 on the Gem label, a subsidiary of Discovery.)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
"Lonesome And Blue" - Joan Shaw With Hal Singer And His Orchestra - Coral 65086 - 1952.


Above Left: Label image for King 4566 released in 1952. Again, LaVern Baker had a hand in composing both of the above songs under the name Delores Williams.

Above Right: Label image for King 4601 released in 1953. Henry Glover, co-composer shown on the above labels, was an A&R man for King Records and a prolific writer for the label. The flip sides of these two King records are instrumentals by Todd Rhodes Orchestra.

Above Left: Todd Rhodes, from Detroit, who was a pianist, orchestra leader, composer, and arranger. It was Todd Rhodes' "Blues For The Red Boy" that Alan Freed used as the theme song for his WJW (Cleveland) Moondog Show.

Above Right: DETROIT TRIBUNE, June 21, 1947.
Todd Rhodes and his band, of Club Sensation, who are running in 2nd place in the Band poll.
(NOTE: Their first records were on Detroit's Sensation label.)
(NOTE: At this time, the band consisted of George Favors, baritone sax; Louis Barnell, tenor sax; Hal Dismukes, alto sax; Howard Thompson, trumpet; Huestell Tally, drums; Joe Williams, bass; and Todd Rhodes, piano. Rhodes is in the back center at the piano, but difficult to see. They ended up winning first place in the Band poll.)

The Cash Box Review (2/28/53):

TODD RHODES — King 4601....
Lost Child (B)

The Todd Rhodes ork come through with a tender item in the moody vein. Laverne Baker handles the vocal end, and the full throated thrush does a potent job. A little more restraint would have gone better with the general tone of the etching.

(NOTE: A rating of B was considered "very good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Pig Latin Blues" - Lavern Baker - King 4566 - 1952.
2. "Lost Child" - Laverne Baker - King 4601 - 1953.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


EXTRA AUDIO #5 (Windows Media Player): THE ROCKETS — STICK McGHEE
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

Above Left: Label image for Atlantic 988 recorded on December 30, 1952 released in 1953. Per Pete Grendysa, the Atlantic files give the personnel for The Rockets as Haywood "Little Sonny" Warner, W. Byrd, G. Byrd, ? Hunter, and ? Williams. Little Sonny, of course, went on to be a big star. The Rockets recorded five songs, all on December 30, 1952, but only this one record was released. Listen for the cute ending to "Open The Door".

Above Middle: Label image for Atlantic 991 recorded on December 8, 1951 and released in 1953. Stick McGhee's lead singing is backed vocally by members of his orchestra.

Above Right: Stick McGhee, born as Granville Henry McGhee, was a guitarist, singer and songwriter. His brother was blues guitarist Brownie McGee. Stick's first record for Atlantic Records, "Drinkin' Wine, Spo-Dee-O-Dee", was a big hit on the rhythm and blues charts.

Above Left: Vann Walls, aka Harry Van Walls, was born as Harry Eugene Vann. His piano can be heard on many Atlantic records and particularly on Joe Turner's early releases for the label. On Atlantic, Van Walls had releases as "Van 'Piano Man' Walls And His After Hours Session Boys" (1950), backing Joe Turner as "Van 'Piano Man' Walls" (1951-56), as "Harry Van Walls And His Orchestra" (1952), as well as Vann Walls And The Rockets (1953).

Above Right: THE CASH BOX, April 25, 1953.

At Left: THE CASH BOX, April 18, 1953.

The Billboard Review (4/18/53):

THE ROCKETS-VANN WALLS — Atlantic 988....
Big Leg Mama (81)
Here's a potent hunk of wax, which with exposure could break thru. The Rockets, a powerful new vocal group, sing this melodic opus with spirit and a solid beat, helped by Vann Walls on piano. It's a strong side that looks headed for coins.
Open The Door (78) A slow-tempo blues, with a lot of comic kicks, is handled warmly by the group, sparked by a good lead who both sings and talks the lyrics. Vann Walls contributes his usual listenable piano stylings. Final gimmick adds to the disk. Another good side.

(NOTE: A rating of 70-79 was considered "good" and 80-89 "excellent".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Open The Door" - Vann Walls And The Rockets - Atlantic 988 - 1953.
2. "Big Leg Mama" - Vann Walls And The Rockets - Atlantic 988 - 1953.
3. "Meet You In The Morning" - Stick McGhee And His Buddies - Atlantic 991 - 1953.

ALL THREE SONGS played in sequence.


EXTRA AUDIO #6 (Windows Media Player): RAY CHARLES
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

Above Left: Photo of Ray Charles, who was a singer, pianist, composer, and band leader. He would become a star artist for the Swing Time and Atlantic labels.

Above Right: Label image for Atlantic 1021 recorded on May 17, 1953 and released in 1954. This song's style is a derivative of Willie Mabon's "I Don't Know" and a precursor to "Riot In Cell Block #9" by The Robins, "The Big Break" by Richard Berry, and "I Gotta New Car" by Big Boy Groves.

At Left: THE CASH BOX, March 13, 1954.
(NOTE: "Soul On Fire", released in August 1953, was apparently still going strong in March 1954.)

The Billboard's "New Records To Watch" (2/13/54):

RAY CHARLES — Atlantic 1021....
It Should've Been Me/A Sinner's Prayer

This is without doubt Charles' hottest disking to date. The first side is a bright ditty in the "I Don't Know" tradition, and the flip is a mournful blues on which the warbler sings his heart out. Either, or both sides, could break big.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): — "I Don't Know" - Willie Mabon And His Combo - Chess 1531 - 1952.

The Billboard's "This Week's Best Buy" (3/20/54):

RAY CHARLES — Atlantic 1021....
It Should've Been Me

Record broke nationally this past week, appearing on the Los Angeles and Chicago territorial charts, and reported strong in Philadelphia, Cicinnati, Nashville, and St. Louis as well. Disk was also rated good in Boston, New York, Cleveland, Detroit, Durham, and Atlanta. Flip is "Sinner's Prayer".

(NOTE: Ray Charles' "It Should've Been Me" made it up to number five on Billboard's "Most Played In Juke Boxes" chart and number eight on Billboard's "Best Sellers In Stores" chart.)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
"It Should've Been Me" - Ray Charles And His Orchestra - Atlantic 1021 - 1953.


Above Left: Label image for Atlantic 1004, both sides recorded on June 19, 1953 and the record released in August 1953. Here LaVern gets composer credit on the label as "Baker". "Jermet" is the short version for Jerry Wexler and Ahmet Ertegun, Atlantic executives.

Above Right: Label image for Atlantic 1030 recorded on March 25, 1954 and released in May 1954.


(THE BILLBOARD—OCTOBER 24, 1953)


(THE CASH BOX—MAY 29, 1954)

THE CASH BOX, May 30, 1953:
....Atlantic Records signed two new artists last week. LaVerne Baker (formerly Miss Sharecropper) and Carmen Taylor. Miriam Abramson expects big things from the newly inked pair....

NEW YORK AGE, June 27, 1953:
....Laverne Baker, lovely singer who just played the Apollo theatre last week, is another product of Detroit that has made good in the Big City. I don't understand why they would tag her with that terrible billing "Miss Sharecropper"and Al Green, her manager, should know better....

The Billboard Review (6/5/54):

LAVERN BAKER — Atlantic 1030....
I Can't Hold Out Any Longer
(76) This bright blues brings out the exciting qualities of this singer's voice. Building quietly, she achieves a wild climax that impresses. Gal could get attention on this one.
I'm Living My Life For You (75) Miss Baker takes a tune from the pop field and dresses it up in a sexy, sophisticated blues version here. Her personality is effectively projected and underlined by the restrained backing of the ork.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 70-79 was considered "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Soul On Fire" - LaVerne Baker - Atlantic 1004 - 1953.
2. "How Can You Leave A Man Like This?" - LaVerne Baker - Atlantic 1004 - 1953.
3. "I Can't Hold Out Any Longer" - LaVern Baker - Atlantic 1030 - 1954.
4. "I'm Living My Life For You" - LaVern Baker - Atlantic 1030 - 1954.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.



(THE BILLBOARD—AUGUST 15, 1953)


EXTRA AUDIO #7 (Windows Media Player): THE DIAMONDS
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

Above Left: Label image for Atlantic 1003 recorded on October 29, 1952 and released in August 1953.

Above Middle: The Diamonds (Top L-R) Harold "Sonny" Wright, Daniel Stevens, Myles "Mousey" Hardy, and (Bottom) Ernest "Rocky" Ward.

Above Right: Label image for Atlantic 1017 recorded on November 5, 1953 and released in December 1953. The above records were the second and third of a total of three by The Diamonds on Atlantic. The first was released in December 1952.

The Cash Box Review (8/22/53):

THE DIAMONDS — Atlantic 1003....
I'll Live Again (B)
The Diamonds dish up a slow ballad softy with the lead singing well against an easy blend by the balance of the group. A tender love tune etched in easy on the ears style.
Two Loves Have I (B) The Diamonds perform a romantic ballad in a similar soft vein. Two restful sides.

(NOTE: A rating of B was considered "very good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "I'll Live Again" - The Diamonds - Atlantic 1003 - 1953.
2. "Two Loves Have I" - The Diamonds - Atlantic 1003 - 1953.
3. "Romance In The Dark" - The Diamonds - Atlantic 1017 - 1953.
4. "Cherry" - The Diamonds - Atlantic 1017 - 1953.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


NOTE: Most discographical information provided at this website is from Ferdie Gonzalez' Disco-File.


Listen to all this week's selections using Windows Media Player:
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

          1. "Trying" - Lavern Baker - King 4556 - 1952.
          2. "Too Late" - Ivory Joe Hunter - King 4405-A - 1950.
          3. "How Long" - Miss Sharecropper - National 9151 - 1951.
          4. "I've Tried" - Miss Sharecropper - National 9151 - 1951.
          5. "Take Out Some Time" - Miss Sharecropper - National 9153 - 1951.
          6. "I Want To Rock" - Miss Sharecropper - National 9153 - 1951.
          7. "Run Joe" - Louis Jordan And His Tympany Five (With The Calypso Boys) - Decca 24448 A - 1947.
          8. "My Beat Is 125th St." - Eunice Davis - Atlantic 992 - 1953.
          9. "Go To Work Pretty Daddy" - Eunice Davis - Atlantic 992 - 1953.
        10. "I Want A Lavender Cadillac" - Maurice King And His Wolverines (Vocal By Bea Baker) - OKeh 6800 - 1951.
        11. "Lonesome And Blue" - Joan Shaw With Hal Singer And His Orchestra - Coral 65086 - 1952.
        12. "Pig Latin Blues" - Lavern Baker - King 4566 - 1952.
        13. "Lost Child" - Laverne Baker - King 4601 - 1953.
        14. "Open The Door" - Vann Walls And The Rockets - Atlantic 988 - 1953.
        15. "Big Leg Mama" - Vann Walls And The Rockets - Atlantic 988 - 1953.
        16. "Meet You In The Morning" - Stick McGhee And His Buddies - Atlantic 991 - 1953.
        17. "I Don't Know" - Willie Mabon And His Combo - Chess 1531 - 1952
        18. "It Should've Been Me" - Ray Charles And His Orchestra - Atlantic 1021 - 1953.
        19. "Soul On Fire" - LaVerne Baker - Atlantic 1004 - 1953.
        20. "How Can You Leave A Man Like This?" - LaVerne Baker - Atlantic 1004 - 1953.
        21. "I Can't Hold Out Any Longer" - LaVern Baker - Atlantic 1030 - 1954.
        22. "I'm Living My Life For You" - LaVern Baker - Atlantic 1030 - 1954.
        23. "I'll Live Again" - The Diamonds - Atlantic 1003 - 1953.
        24. "Two Loves Have I" - The Diamonds - Atlantic 1003 - 1953.
        25. "Romance In The Dark" - The Diamonds - Atlantic 1017 - 1953.
        26. "Cherry" - The Diamonds - Atlantic 1017 - 1953.
 
          ALL TWENTY-SIX ABOVE SONGS played in sequence.
 
          ALL TWELVE SONGS ABOVE BY LAVERN BAKER played in sequence.



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