#942 (11/21/20)

SPOTLIGHT ON RUTH BROWN - PART THREE (1955-1956)

"I Can See Everybody's Baby"/
"As Long As I'm Moving"
Ruth Brown
And Her Rhythmakers
on Atlantic 1059
released in 1955

"What'd I Say"/
"It's Love Baby"
Ruth Brown
With Orchestra
on Atlantic 1072
released in 1955

"Love Has Joined Us Together"/
"I Gotta Have You"
Ruth Brown And Clyde McPhatter
With Orchestra
on Atlantic 1077
released in 1955

"Old Man River"/
"I Want To Do More"
Ruth Brown
And Her Rhythmakers
on Atlantic 1082
released in 1955

"Sweet Baby Of Mine"/
"I'm Getting Right"
Ruth Brown
With Orchestra
on Atlantic 1091
released in 1956

"I Want To Be Loved"/
"Mom Oh Mom"
Ruth Brown
With Orchestra And Chorus
on Atlantic 1102
released in 1956

(Includes One Video And Audio For Twenty-Seven Songs)



[The above photos provided by Hans-Joachim Krohberger.]
Above: Two photos of RUTH BROWN.

RICHMOND TIMES DISPATCH, November 23, 1955: PORTSMOUTH'S RUTH BROWN TO STAR HERE
Six years ago Ruth Brown was a nobody in Portsmouth. She sang in her father's choir and whenever she tried to sing popular songs, he made her hush her mouth.

Today Ruth is one of the headliners of the "1956 Jazz, Rhythm And Blues Show" which will play a single performance at the Mosque at 8:30 P.M. on Sunday, December 4.... Despite parental objection, Ruth left Portsmouth in 1948 and got a job with Lucky Millinder [a famous orchestra leader] in Washington. She was fired shortly afterward and told to go back to hymns and spirituals.

Ruth was stage struck by this time, so she went over to Washington's Crystal Caverns and bluffed her way into a job there. It was here that she was "discovered" by Cab Calloway's sister, Blanche. She was struck with Ruth's unusual styling, took the youngster under her wing and got her an engagement in New York City.

A recording session was set up, but bad luck continued to plague Ruth. She was badly injured in an automobile accident and was laid up for ten months. It was 1949 before the recording date could be filled, but her first disk, "So Long", made enough of an impression to send her on toward her present enviable position in the blues-singing field....

Click HERE for an article about Ruth Brown by Marv Goldberg. (Will open in a separate window)


[The above photo provided by Hans-Joachim Krohberger.]
Above: Photo of RUTH BROWN, CLYDE McPHATTER, AND LaVERN BAKER.
Clyde had been the lead singer of The Drifters on Atlantic, but at this point was Atlantic Records' star male singles artist. LaVern Baker was a star on Atlantic Records throughout the mid-to-late 1950's, including the big 1954-55 hit "Tweedle Dee".

Above: Label images for Atlantic 1059, both sides recorded on March 1, 1955, and Atlantic 1072, this side also recorded on March 1, 1955, the flip on July 7, 1955. Both records were released in 1955. Composer "Nugetre" is an easily deciphered pen-name for Ahmet Ertegun, Atlantic Records' Vice President.
of clyde



At Left: THE CASH BOX, August 6, 1955.

Directly Above: THE BILLBOARD, April 30, 1955.









THE CASH BOX DATED APRIL 30, 1955



THE CASH BOX DATED AUGUST 6, 1955

The Billboard Review Spotlight (8/6/55):

RUTH BROWN — Atlantic 1072....
What'd I Say/It's Love Baby
The thrush has a great two-sided platter, which should grab off many spins from jocks and jukes. "What'd I Say" is an engaging novelty, featuring a unique drum-sound and a provocative tempo. "It's Love Baby" is an appealing ballad, sung with expressive sincerity. The canary sells with showmanly abandon on both sides.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "I Can See Everybody's Baby" - Ruth Brown And Her Rhythmakers - Atlantic 1059 - 1955.
2. "As Long As I'm Moving" - Ruth Brown And Her Rhythmakers - Atlantic 1059 - 1955.
3. "What'd I Say" - Ruth Brown - Atlantic 1072 - 1955.
4. "It's Love Baby" - Ruth Brown - Atlantic 1072 - 1955.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


EXTRA AUDIO #1 (Windows Media Player): IT'S LOVE BABY

Above Left: Label image for Excello 2056 A recorded in March 1955 and released in 1955.

Above Middle: Label image for Federal 12227 recorded on June 6, 1955 and released in July 1955.

Above Right: Label image for Atlantic 1072 recorded on July 7, 1955 and released in 1955.

NOTE: Ted Jarrett, the composer of "It's Love Baby", was a central figure in Nashville rhythm and blues. He was a hit songwriter, musician, producer, artist manager, and talent scout. At various times in the early to mid-1950s, Jarrett was the head of A&R for the Excello, Republic, Tennessee, Kit, and Calvert labels, all located in Nashville. He also was a disk jockey, at WSOK in Nashville, in the early 1950s.



Above Left: NASHBORO (EXCELLO) RECORDS Advertisement, June 1955.

Above Right: THE CASH BOX, April 2, 1955: BEST R&B VOCAL GROUP OF 1954
NEW YORK CITY—The Midnighters, Federal Records' big recording stars, receive their trophy from Bob Austin (center) for copping first place in the race for best rhythm and blues vocal group of '54. The boys had a number of big hits in '54 including the #1 record "Work With Me Annie". One of the boys holds the gold record from Federal for the same song.



Above Left: THE CASH BOX, September 17, 1955. (NOTE: Earl Gaines is the vocalist on Louis Brook's "It's Love Baby").

Above Right: THE CASH BOX, July 2, 1955: AWARD O' THE WEEK


The Billboard...This Week's Best Buys (7/2/55):

LOUIS BROOKS — Excello 2056....
It's Love Baby
—From the South increasingly impressive reports are coming in on this record. This week Brooks' disk hit the Atlanta territorial chart and was selling nicely in Nashville, Memphis, Durham,, and St. Louis as well. Spilling over into Chicago and Detroit now, it could sweep the country, and retailers and operators are forewarned.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "It's Love Baby" - Louis Brooks And His Hi-Toppers (Vocal By Earl Gaines) - Excello 2056 A - 1955.
2. "It's Love Baby" - The Midnighters - Federal 12227 - 1955.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


RUTH BROWN POSTERS:

1955 APOLLO POSTER



1956 APOLLO POSTER - PART ONE



1956 APOLLO POSTER - PART TWO



1957 CHATTANOOGA POSTER



1959 APOLLO POSTER



1955 ATLANTIC ADVERTISEMENT


EXTRA AUDIO #2 (Windows Media Player): JOE TURNER

Above Left: Label image for Decca 8563 B recorded on June 13, 1941 released later in 1941.

Above Middle: Photo of Art Tatum, who was famous as pianist, arranger, and band leader.

Above Right: Label image for Atlantic 1088 recorded on February 24, 1956 and released in 1956. ASCAP lists Armelia Chatman and Mitchell Parrish as co-composers of "Corrine Corrina", but not J.N. Williams [sic], who was J. Mayo Williams, head of Decca's race department at the time. Parrish, a lyricist, wrote the words to Hoagy Carmichaels' "Stardust". The flip-side, "Boogie Woogie Country Girl", was recorded on November 3, 1955.




Above Left: Label image for Varsity 8179 recorded on January 15, 1940 and released later in 1940.

Above Middle: Photo of Joe Turner (also known as "Big Joe Turner").

Above Right: Photo of Ahmet Ertegun (Atlantic Records), Joe Turner, and Jerry Wexler (Atlantic Records), all holding 45-rpm records of Joe Turner's "Corrine Corrina" on the Atlantic label.

At Direct Left: THE CASH BOX, March 31, 1956.
(NOTE: It was Frankie Laine, known as "Mr. Rhythm", who dubbed Ruth Brown as "Miss Rhythm" at a stage show in 1950, after seeing the audience's reaction to her performance.)

The Cash Box Review (3/31/56):

JOE TURNER — Atlantic 1088....
Corrine Corrina/Boogie Woogie Country Girl
—Joe Turner turns in two excellent performances, both of which can bring in a strong reaction. However, it is our impression that "Corrine Corrina" will take most of the marbles. It is a swinging, middle beat jump with a happy lyric, a real rocking Turner vocal, and a driving orchestral backdrop. The kids will be singing "Corrine Corrina" before very long. The flip, "Boogie Woogie Country Girl", is a quick beat boogie not to be undersold. This one can make it on its own. (Van "Piano Man") Walls on the piano flavors the deck no end. Turner has a couple of lines that can make this one. "What I mean, What I mean" and "Red jacket shoit [shirt with an accent]" can be just what the deck needs to break it. Watch both sides carefully.

The Billboard...This Week's Best Buys (4/14/56):

JOE TURNER — Atlantic 1088....
Corrine Corrina
—Southern markets were quick to respond to Turner's latest. Atlanta, Durham, New Orleans, Nashville, for example, reported very fast turnover immediately. Excellent reports have also come out of Chicago, Cleveland, St. Louis, Baltimore, New York, and Philadelphia this week, and it appears to be a major threat in all areas now. A previous Billboard "Spotlight" pick.


THE CASH BOX COVER, April 7, 1956:
CAPTION: Joe Turner, Atlantic Records star, is shown with Ahmet Ertegun and Jerry Wexler, Atlantic veepees, personally examining the grooves of his latest release "Corrine Corrina". Turner, one of the most consistent hitmakers in the rhythm and blues field, is in addition one of the great "names" in the history of jazz. Years ago, Turner was a jazz blues singer in the Kansas City jazz style. In the early thirties, he sang with jazz pianist Pete Johnson in Kansas City and only a couple of weeks ago, Atlantic brought Johnson in for the session along with Walter Page, Freddie Green, and other K.C. stars to recreate with Joe the Kansas City blues singing style he made famous.


LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Corrine Corrina" - Art Tatum Band (Vocal By Joe Turner) - Decca 8563 B - 1941.
2. "Corrine Corrina" - Joe Turner - Atlantic 1088 - 1956.
3. "Boogie Woogie Country Girl" - Joe Turner - Atlantic 1088 - 1956.
4. "Shake It And Break It" - Varsity Seven (Vocal By Joe Turner) - Varsity 8179 - 1940.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


Above Left: THE CASH BOX, April 2, 1955: BEST FEMALE VOCALIST
NEW YORK—Ruth Brown, Atlantic thrush, receives her trophy from Norman Orleck of The Cash Box for being selected "The Best Female Vocalist in the Rhythm & Blues Field for 1954" in the 9th Annual Cash Box Poll. At the Apollo Theatre, that same night, Atlantic Records presented Ruth with a gold record for reaching the 5,000,000 mark in sales since she's been with the diskery.

Above Middle: THE CASH BOX, April 2, 1955.
(NOTE: "Bye Bye Young Men" was a featured song in the "Spotlight On Ruth Brown - Part Two" Record of the Week.)

Above Right: THE CASH BOX, September 24, 1955: NEW DUO
NEW YORK—Singers Ruth Brown and Clyde McPhatter take time out during a break in their recording session at Atlantic Records studios to chat with Jerry Wexler, left, and Ahmet Ertegun, who supervised the date. This was the first time that the two hot attractions on the Atlantic label had been teamed together for a date.

NEW YORK AGE, August 13, 1955 ....Ruth Brown certainly ranks among the top of the long list of Apollo headliner stars. This is about the fourth year Ruth has been picked over all the others to play the important opening Apollo date. The reason? She's one of the greatest song stylists around today and she is always near or at the top in recording popularity (her current is "As Long As I'm Moving")....


Above Left: Photo of Clyde McPhatter.

Above Right: Label image for Atlantic 1077 released in 1955, both sides recorded on August 29, 1955.


THE CASH BOX DATED OCTOBER 15, 1955


Above: Photo of (L-R) Jerry Wexler, Ruth Brown, Clyde McPhatter, LaVern Baker, Ahmet Ertegun. Wexler and Ertegun were Atlantic Records executives.

Above Left: INDIANAPOLIS RECORDER, September 17, 1955: KING AND QUEEN
Clyde McPhatter (standing) and Ruth Brown, acknowledged King and Queen of the Rhythm and Blues singers, rehearse with their pianist before teaming up for a recording session in New York. The popular pair, in their first combined date, cut four original tunes predicted to have the disk jocks and juke boxes spinning during the coming year.
(NOTE: Atlantic elected to release only the one record by them.)

Above Right: THE CASH BOX, May 12, 1956: BEST R&B FEMALE OF 1955
NEW YORK—Ruth Brown, who makes a habit of winning The Cash Box Awards, is congratulated by well wishers after being awarded her trophy for copping the #1 spot in the Rhythm and Blues Female Vocalist category. Wishing Ruth good luck are: (left to right) Ahmet Ertegun, Atlantic v.p.; Norman Orleck, The Cash Box; Clyde McPhatter (in uniform), Ruth's brother recording artist on Atlantic; WWRL jockey Tommy Smalls, N.Y.C.; Jerry Wexler, Atlantic v.p.; and Marty Ostrow, The Cash Box.
(NOTE: The Cash Box awarded Atlantic Records' LaVern Baker as "Most Promising R&B Female Of 1955".)

Above: THE BILLBOARD, October 8, 1955. (Clyde and Ruth are holding a 78-rpm copy of their record.)

The Billboard Review Spotlight (10/8/55):

CLYDE McPHATTER AND RUTH BROWN — Atlantic 1077....
Love Has Joined Us Together
Two top personalities in the field team up on a moving ballad of mutual devotion with a distinctive prayer-meeting flavor. Figures to get maximum initial attention from the spin set, then should carry thru well on its own. Flip is a good shouter called "I Gotta Have You".

The Billboard Best Buy... Rhythm And Blues (11/12/55):

RUTH BROWN & CLYDE McPHATTER — Atlantic 1077....
Love Has Joined Us Together/I Gotta Have You

Strong sales reports from Durham, Charlotte, Atlanta, St. Louis, Detroit, Nashville, Richmond, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, and Cleveland indicate that this record is now threatening to jump into national listings if it gets a little more push. Territories differ as to top side, but "Love" is preferred by a majority. A previous Billboard "Spotlight" pick.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Love Has Joined Us Together" - Ruth Brown And Clyde McPhatter - Atlantic 1077 - 1955.
2. "I Gotta Have You" - Clyde McPhatter And Ruth Brown - Atlantic 1077 - 1955.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


RUTH BROWN IN FILM:

Above: Two still shots from the 1955 movie "Rhythm And Blues Revue". Ruth Brown is singing "Teardrops From My Eyes". Willie Bryant is the master of ceremonies. The "PW" is the Paul "Hucklebuck" Williams band, who gets no screen credit in this movie. Williams is the saxophonist in the plaid jacket. Ruth's performance for this movie was filmed in 1954.

WATCH the VIDEO of Ruth Brown singing "Teardrops From My Eyes" in MP4 format.
(Will open in a new window)

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO ONLY (USING WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER):
"Teardrops From My Eyes" - Ruth Brown - Rhythm And Blues Revue - 1955.

LISTEN TO HER RELEASED 78-RPM RECORD (USING WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
"Teardrops From My Eyes" - Ruth Brown - Atlantic 919 - 1950.


ROCK AND ROLL REVUE POSTER

At Left: KANSAS CITY STAR, October 30, 1955:
ROCK AND ROLL REVUE ADVERTISEMENT

FROM REVEREND PHILLIP BEAUCHAMP:
In 1955 Studio Films released three films "Rock 'n Roll Revue" ("Harlem Rock 'n Roll" in England), "Rhythm 'n Blues Revue", and "Jazz Festival" with RUTH BROWN in all three films. (Studio films released "Basin Street Revue" in 1956 but she is not in it) These three films were a combination of live segments that were shot in 1954 in a studio in Manhattan, New York (not at The Apollo Theater) and Snader Telescriptions (Soundies for TV) 1948-1952.

Studio Films bought out the whole Snader catalog in 1952 when Snader folded that year. All the three films are 65 minutes long (R 'n R Revue on YouTube is incomplete). The live and Snader segments were all filmed in Black and White. However, "Rock n' Roll Revue" and "Rhythm 'n Blues Revue", for the theaters' release, were tinted with a Brownish Red that Studio Films called Kaleidoscopic WonderColor. All these films without the tint were later part of The Showtime At The Apollo TV shows.

As for Willie Bryant saying "Harlem Variety Revue" (during his opening remarks for "Rock 'N Roll Revue"), that may be an early working title but it was also a subtitle for one of the episodes of The Showtime At The Apollo TV shows. Supposely, The Showtime At The Apollo TV shows had subtitles for each episode. The other subtitles that I found are Beale Street Revue, Blues From Harlem, Rhythm From Harlem, Revue In Rhythm, Showtime In Harlem, Stars Over Harlem, Downbeat Revue, Variety Time, and Jazztime.




Above Left: Label image for Atlantic 1082 recorded on March 2, 1956. The flip "I'm Getting Right", composed by Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller, was recorded on October 19, 1955. The record was released in 1955. Lieber and Stoller also composed her 1957 hit "Lucky Lips".

Above Right: Label image for Atlantic 1091 recorded on May 7, 1954. The flip "I Want To Do More", was recorded on October 22, 1955. The record was released in 1955.


THE CASH BOX DATED DECEMBER 10, 1955
At Left: CHATTANOOGA DAILY TIMES, April 22, 1956. (NOTE: Ruth garners the top of this talented list of artists.)

The Cash Box Review (3/31/56):

RUTH BROWN — Atlantic 1091....
Sweet Baby Of Mine/I'm Getting Right
—Ruth Brown covers a rock and roll item by Bobby Sharp and gives it such an exciting treatment that the deck, "Sweet Baby Of Mine", looks like a winner. The material stirs one, and Ruth makes the most of it. It could be the biggest Brown hit in some time. Keep very close tabs on it. The flip, "I'm Getting Right", is a quick beat, high flying tune, that is read with spirit. Miss Brown turns in a hard hitting, happy job against an early jazz flavored backdrop that comes off very well. What can we say? Watch this side too.
(NOTE: All of The Cash Box and Billboard reviews [that have been researched] have given Ruth glowing reports over the years, albeit very deserved.)

The Billboard Review Spotlight (4/7/56):

RUTH BROWN — Atlantic 1091....
Sweet Baby/I'm Getting Right
The thrush has a fine two-sided hit in her new platter. She's in her usual sock vocal form on "Sweet Baby Of Mine", a moving rhythmic torcher, which could go pop as well as r.&b. The flip is a crisp rhythmic ditty, and provides a neat showcase for the canary's effective vocal tricks. Excellent backing job spotlights a grunting bari sax instead of the usual tenor.

THE BILLBOARD, April 14, 1956: ....Last week, The Billboard's panel of experts picked Ruth Brown's new Atlantic coupling as a Spotlight pick. One of the two sides, "Sweet Baby", now turns out to be the same tune as "Baby Girl Of Mine", which was released about seven weeks back as recorded by the cleffer, Bobby Sharp, on Wing. Tune is published by Teddy Powell's Maggie Music (BMI). Sharp's record is reported making some noise in Philadelphia and New York....

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Old Man River" - Ruth Brown And Her Rhythmakers - Atlantic 1082 - 1955.
2. "I Want To Do More" - Ruth Brown And Her Rhythmakers - Atlantic 1082 - 1955.
3. "Sweet Baby Of Mine" - Ruth Brown - Atlantic 1091 - 1956.
4. "I'm Getting Right" - Ruth Brown - Atlantic 1091 - 1956.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


EXTRA AUDIO #3 (Windows Media Player): OLD MAN RIVER

Above Left: Label image for Decca 7768 A recorded on March 11, 1940 and released in 1941.

Above Middle Left: Label image for Vocalion v 4086 recorded on March 4, 1938 and released in 1938. The "v" possibly indicates it is a master obtained from the Variety label.

Above Center: Label image for National 9035-A recorded on April 24, 1947 and released in 1947. The Ravens' great bass singer, Jimmy Ricks, sings lead on this song.

Above Middle Right: Label image for Majestic 78-123 released in 1950.

Above Right: Label image for Checker 872 released in June 1957. This record (both sides) was first released on Casa Grande 4037 two months earlier in 1947. Note the misspelling of "Kern" on the label.



Above Left: The Snub Mosley Band. Snub is in the darker suit playing the trombone. Snub also invented and played the slide saxophone. The vocalist at left is June Eckstine, the wife of singer Billy Eckstine.

Above Middle: Photo of Cootie Williams.

Above Right: MIAMI HERALD, February 25, 1942: SHE'S HOLDOVER
Jerry Kruger, rich-voiced singer whose popularity has forced Mother Kelly's to hold her over.
(NOTE: Jerry Kruger is the singer on the Cootie Williams' "Ol' Man River" record.)



Above Left: Dusty Brooks And The Four Tones. Dusty is playing the bass fiddle.
[This photo provided by Hans-Joachim Krohberger.]

Above Middle: Photo of The Ravens. The bass singer is Jimmy Ricks (Top Center).

Above Right: The Tune Weavers advertisement from November 1957.

At Direct Left: THE CASH BOX, September 1, 1947.
(NOTE: The Ravens' "Ol' Man River" is the number one record in New York City's Harlem.)

The Cash Box Review (7/7/47):

THE RAVENS — National 9035....
Ol' Man River....
—Fast rising combo on the wax scene are The Ravens, and their rendition of an old time favorite is bound to win them new fans galore. Novel waxing of "Old Man River" turns up as a platter that ops with race and other locations should use to liven up phono [juke box] play. Ditty spins in medium fast tempo with the deep bass vocal riding thru to garner the limelight on the side....

The Billboard Review (11/29/47):

THE RAVENS — National 9035....
Ol' Man River....
—Plenty of persuation in the harmony singing of this sepia fourtet, their singing all the more compelling in the contrast of the low bass voice of Jimmy Ricks and the high tenor of Maithe Marshall. Moreover, there's a trim rhythmic flair in their fashioning, most pronounced for their styling of Ol' Man River....in modern dress....


LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Ol' Man River" - Snub Mosley And His Band - Decca 7768 A - 1941.
2. "Ol' Man River" - Cootie Williams And His Rug Cutters (Vocal By Jerry Kruger) - Vocalion v 4086 - 1938.
3. "Ol' Man River" - The Ravens - National 9035-A - 1947.
4. "Ol' Man River" - Dusty Brooks And The Four Tones - Majestic 78-123 - 1950.
5. "Ol Man River" - The Tune Weavers - Checker 872 - 1957.

ALL FIVE SONGS played in sequence.


THE BILLBOARD DATED NOVEMBER 25, 1950


Above Left: Label image for Atlantic 1102. Both sides recorded on June 12, 1956. The record was released in 1956. On this uptempo version of "I Want To Be Loved", Ruth is backed by an uncredited vocal group.

This label and, generally, all labels and sheet music for "I Want To Be Loved" show Savannah Churchill as composer of the song. In actuality, Savannah had no part in writing it. The song was composed solely by William "Pat" Best, who was in her backing group, The Sentamentalists (soon after to become The Four Tunes). Pat Best also helped Savannah in how to perform the song on stage and in her movie appearance (the 1948 movie "Miracle In Harlem").

Above Right: THE BILLBOARD, August 4, 1956. Two of the label numbers shown are incorrect. "Mom Oh Mom"/"I Want To Be Loved" is Atlantic 1102 and "Lipstick, Powder And Paint"/"Rock A While" is Atlantic 1100. Atlantic 1104 is LaVern Baker's "Still"/"I Can't Love You Enough". Also, the correct name of the song is "Mom Oh Mom".


THE CASH BOX DATED AUGUST 4, 1956


Above: THE CASH BOX, December 1, 1956: ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
NORFOLK, VA.—Ruth Brown is shown receiving the WRAP Achievement Award from disk jockeys Bill Curtis (left) and Mark Allen (right). The occasion was the dance promoted by Curtis at which he presented new disk jockey Allen to the audience and Allen in turn presented the Atlantic Records songstress with the award. The affair was held at the Petite Ballroom in Portsmouth, Virginia, Miss Brown's home town.

The Billboard Review (8/4/56):

RUTH BROWN — Atlantic 1102....
Mom, Oh Mom
(84) Watch this one. The fine chantress has a waltz-time melody here that really stays with you. This material, coupled with the excitement Miss Brown gives any good song, makes this one stand out. Side is likely to have a good pop sale too.
I Want To Be Loved (78) A change of pace from the flip is this fast side with an intricate rhythm pattern. Miss Brown gives a virtuoso performance of the old Savannah Churchill vehicle.
(NOTE: A ratings range of 70-79 was considered "good" and 80-89 "excellent".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "I Want To Be Loved" - Ruth Brown And Chorus - Atlantic 1102 - 1956.
2. "Mom Oh Mom" - Ruth Brown And Chorus - Atlantic 1102 - 1956.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


EXTRA AUDIO #4 (Windows Media Player): I WANT TO BE LOVED

Above Left: Label image for Manor 1046-B released in December 1946. This same record was also released as by Savannah Churchill And The Four Tunes, after The Sentimentalists changed their name.

Above Middle Left: Label image for Majestic 1136 A recorded in May 1947 and released in 1947. Vocal is by Billy Mathews, who later led the vocal groups The Ballardiers on the Arlington label (1949) and The Balladeers on Jubilee (1950).

Above Middle Right: Label image for Continental C-6048-B released in April 1947. This is the first of two records by this group, both on the Continental label, both released in the same month.

Above Right: Label image for Decca 23879 A recorded on April 2, 1947 and released in May 1947.
The Hamptonians consisted of Lionel Hampton and members of his orchestra, Curly Hamner, Charles Harris, and Billy Mackell.

[NOTE: Other artists in 1947 with released records of "I Want To Be Loved" include Beryl Davis, Benny Goodman And Orchestra, The Modernaires, Sy Oliver And Orchestra, George Towne, and Gordon MacRae. Again, this song was composed by William "Pat" Best, not Savannah Churchill.]

BUT ONLY BY YOU: On all five of the "I Want To Be Loved" records featured on this webpage, the artists actually sing "But By Only You", including the original version by Savannah Churchill And The Sentimentalists. The sheet music lyrics for Savannah Churchill's version has "But Only By You". However, there are some records of this song by other artists that sing "But Only By You", as shown on the labels and sheet music. These include Benny Goodman's Orchestra with vocalist Lillian Lane on Capitol and Beryl Davis on RCA Victor.



Above Left: Photo of Savannah Churchill dated 7/28/55 on the back. However, this photo is from the 1940s.

Above Left Middle: Photo of The Four Tunes, also known as The Sentimentalists. (L-R Top) Jimmy Gordon (bass singer), Jimmie Nabbie (tenor), Danny Owens (tenor), and (Bottom Right) Pat Best (baritone and guitarist).

Above Right Middle: THE BILLBOARD, April 12, 1947 (Golden Arrow Quartet Clipping).

Above Right: Photo of the renowned Lionel Hampton, vibraphonist, pianist, percussionist, singer, and orchestra leader.


Above: Cootie Williams And His Band. Cootie is in the center, playing the trumpet.

At Direct Left: THE CASH BOX, March 31, 1947.

The Billboard Review (5/24/47):

COOTIE WILLIAMS — Majestic 1136....
I Want To Be Loved
—For Savannah Churchill's "I Want To Be Loved", Cootie Williams turns it over to the soft bary voice of Billy Mathews, who pipes it slowly and expressively but without its sultry nuances.... Popularity of "I Want To Be Loved" will bring some phono [juke box] attention to the side.


LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "I Want To Be Loved" - Savannah Churchill And The Sentimentalists - Manor 1046-B - 1946.
2. "I Want To Be Loved" - Cootie Williams Orchestra (Vocal By Billy Mathews) - Majestic 1136 A - 1947.
3. "I Want To Be Loved" - The Golden Arrow Quartet - Continental C-6048-B - 1947.
4. "I Want To Be Loved" - Lionel Hampton And His Hamptonians - Decca 23879 A - 1947.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


Above Left: THE BILLBOARD, December 16, 1957.

Above Left: ATLANTIC RECORDS ADVERTISEMENT, August 1958.

Above Left: STAR TRIBUNE (Minneapolis, MN), August 18, 1958.


At Left: NEW YORK AGE, February 23, 1957 COMING BACK
Ruth Brown's Atlantic waxing of "Lucky Lips" sounds like a big seller. Ruth sang her way to fame a few years ago with a number of tunes penned by Rudy Toombs, including "Mama He Treats Your Daughter Mean".
[NOTE: Toombs did not compose "Mama He Treats Your Daughter Mean", but he did write Ruth's hit songs "Teardrops From My Eyes" and "5-10-15 Hours". "Lucky Lips", composed by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, was a hit in the "pop" field for her.)

THE BILLBOARD, June 9, 1956:
A new, loot-laden area was opened up to r.&b. talent last week—that of TV commercials. The first important act to break the barrier was Atlantic's Ruth Brown, who got the word that her "test" effort for Lucky Strike had been accepted. It has taken the big agencies a long time to wake up to the sock selling abilities of r.&b. talent, but now that Miss Brown has convinced 'em, look out!

NEW YORK AGE, June 1, 1957: RUTH BROWN HEADLINES APOLLO THEATER SHOW
Ruth Brown will headline the exciting Memorial Day show at the Apollo Theater, beginning Friday.... One of the most colorful entertainers on the stage today, Ruth, who has a unique singing style which has brought her fame and fortune during the last decade, has a large following. The lass, who started her climb to fame with the waxing of "Teardrops From My Eyes", is a perfectionist who strives diligently to make her performances as near perfect as humanly possible. She is one of the most polished singers on the stage today....

NEW YORK AGE, September 27, 1958:
Recording star Ruth Brown, whose disc "The Little Girl's Gone Rocking" is currently a juke box hit, bows into the Apollo Theater on Friday.... A long time Apollo favorite, Ruth has appeared all over the country in theaters and night clubs. Her unique style has been captured on many recordings.

There were many more accomplishments to come for Ruth Brown after her Atlantic singing career.

Here are some of them:

  • Recurring role in the TV series "Hello Larry" (1970s).
  • Performed in other TV series and films, including the movie "Hairspray" (1970s-1980s).
  • Tony Award for Best Actress In A Musical for "Black And Blue" (1989).
  • Grammy Award for "Blues And Broadway" LP album (1989).
  • Hosted a radio show "Blues Stage" for six years (1989-1994).
  • Inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame (1993).
  • Her autobiography "Miss Rhythm" won Gleason Award (1995).
  • Nominated for Grammy Award for "R + B = Ruth Brown" LP album (1997).
  • Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award (2016).

NOTE: Most discographical information provided at this website is from Ferdie Gonzalez' Disco-File.


Listen to all this week's selections using Windows Media Player:
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

          1. "I Can See Everybody's Baby" - Ruth Brown And Her Rhythmakers - Atlantic 1059 - 1955.
          2. "As Long As I'm Moving" - Ruth Brown And Her Rhythmakers - Atlantic 1059 - 1955.
          3. "What'd I Say" - Ruth Brown - Atlantic 1072 - 1955.
          4. "It's Love Baby" - Ruth Brown - Atlantic 1072 - 1955.
          5. "It's Love Baby" - Louis Brooks And His Hi-Toppers (Vocal By Earl Gaines) - Excello 2056 A - 1955.
          6. "It's Love Baby" - The Midnighters - Federal 12227 - 1955.
          7. "Corrine Corrina" - Art Tatum Band (Vocal By Joe Turner) - Decca 8563 B - 1941.
          8. "Corrine Corrina" - Joe Turner - Atlantic 1088 - 1956.
          9. "Boogie Woogie Country Girl" - Joe Turner - Atlantic 1088 - 1956.
        10. "Shake It And Break It" - Varsity Seven (Vocal By Joe Turner) - Varsity 8179 - 1940.
        11. "Love Has Joined Us Together" - Ruth Brown And Clyde McPhatter - Atlantic 1077 - 1955.
        12. "I Gotta Have You" - Clyde McPhatter And Ruth Brown - Atlantic 1077 - 1955.
        13. "Old Man River" - Ruth Brown And Her Rhythmakers - Atlantic 1082 - 1955.
        14. "I Want To Do More" - Ruth Brown And Her Rhythmakers - Atlantic 1082 - 1955.
        15. "Sweet Baby Of Mine" - Ruth Brown - Atlantic 1091 - 1956.
        16. "I'm Getting Right" - Ruth Brown - Atlantic 1091 - 1956.
        17. "Ol' Man River" - Snub Mosley And His Band - Decca 7768 A - 1941.
        18. "Ol' Man River" - Cootie Williams And His Rug Cutters (Vocal By Jerry Kruger) - Vocalion v 4086 - 1938.
        19. "Ol' Man River" - The Ravens - National 9035-A - 1947.
        20. "Ol' Man River" - Dusty Brooks And The Four Tones - Majestic 78-123 - 1950.
        21. "Ol Man River" - The Tune Weavers - Checker 872 - 1957.
        22. "I Want To Be Loved" - Ruth Brown And Chorus - Atlantic 1102 - 1956.
        23. "Mom Oh Mom" - Ruth Brown And Chorus - Atlantic 1102 - 1956.
        24. "I Want To Be Loved" - Savannah Churchill And The Sentimentalists - Manor 1046-B - 1946.
        25. "I Want To Be Loved" - Cootie Williams Orchestra (Vocal By Billy Mathews) - Majestic 1136 A - 1947.
        26. "I Want To Be Loved" - The Golden Arrow Quartet - Continental C-6048-B - 1947.
        27. "I Want To Be Loved" - Lionel Hampton And His Hamptonians - Decca 23879 A - 1947.
 
          ALL TWENTY-SEVEN ABOVE SONGS played in sequence.
 
          ALL TWELVE SONGS ABOVE BY RUTH BROWN played in sequence.



           [To download audio files, right-click on song title link and then select "Save link (target) as..."]


CLICK HERE for SPOTLIGHT ON RUTH BROWN - PART ONE (1949-1952).
CLICK HERE for SPOTLIGHT ON RUTH BROWN - PART TWO (1953-1954).
(Above links will open in separate windows)


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