#943 (12/12/20)

"What In The World Am I Goin' To Do"
by Loumell Morgan Trio
on Super Disc 1000A
released in 1945

"Blues In The Night"/"Bow Tie Jim"
by Loumell Morgan Trio
on Apollo 1019
released in 1946




[The above photo courtesy of Paul Ressler.]
Above: LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO. The inscription at right side of photo reads "Musically Jimmy Jam Bass player of Loumell Morgan Trio". Members shown in photo are probably (top) James "Ham" Jackson, (bottom left) Loumell Morgan, and (bottom right) Jimmy "Jam" Smith.

Loumell Morgan (born 1919) was a piano player. He started his career in 1939 with Slim Gaillard And His Flat Foot Floogie Boys, recording with them until 1941. The Loumell Morgan Trio was formed in 1941. They showed up in two movies in 1943, "All By Myself" (in which they perform the title song and another) and "Melody Parade" (performing two songs). They were on many commercial and armed forces transcription discs (1940's). As "Loumell Morgan Quintet", there was one record released on Atlantic (#953) in 1951. Morgan joined The Three Flames in 1954 and stayed with them until they broke up in 1964.

Click HERE for an article about the Loumell Morgan Trio by Marv Goldberg. (Will open in a separate window)

SIOUX CITY JOURNAL SUN, August 24, 1941: LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO ON BASIN STREET PROGRAM
The Loumell Morgan Trio, sprightly instrumental and vocal combination specializing in "jump" rhythms, will light long enough to make their radio debut with the notorious Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street during the weekly session with the Three B's, Monday at 7 p.m. over KSCJ.

The combination, unusual in that they play all the bass notes with their feet in a sort of "soft shoe" effect, comes highly recommended from the midtown Manhattan Rendezvous which closed for repairs the night they ended their engagement there.... For their premiere air appearance the Loumell Morgan Trio will play "The Harlem Whizzer", original concerto by Loumell himself, and the $64 querey, "Whatcha Know Joe?"....

THE BILLBOARD BAND YEAR BOOK, September 26, 1942:
LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO has received rave notices from critics over the nation. Trio, a William Morris Agency attraction, is currently at the Trouville, Los Angeles, following 36 weeks at Swanee Inn, Hollywood. This outstanding vocal and instrumental group is one of the best bets for recordings the Hollywood section has ever produced and is known for its renditions of swing classics.

Outfit, directed and paced by its piano-playing leader, Loumell Morgan, is noted for close harmony of its vocal arrangements which are soft yet rhythmic. Trio has played Kelly's Stable, New York City, the Rendezvous, Philadelphia, and appeared on the Al Pearce And His Gang Show for 10 weeks in addition to the Lower Basin Street air show.

Morgan is known as a composer of such tunes as Sand, Bow Tie Jim, Will I Ever, Let It Ride, Going Nowhere, Morgan Minor, Whirlaway, Christina, and It's A Small World.

THE BILLBOARD, November 21, 1942:
LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO has been together the past two years, but prior to that time for eight years, Morgan has been in bands and had small combos from time to time.

For those who want smooth rhythms with a Harlem beat, this sepia group is the outfit. Morgan turns in a good piano, with James Jackson doing outstanding guitar work. Lynwood Jones slaps a mean bass. Trio handles vocals, and unique arrangements are featured. Morgan takes his piano standing. In addition to pop tunes that can be given a boogey beat, trio does a round of swell originals which Morgan contributes.

Trio has plenty of tricks, and solid entertainment is featured in each turn.


Above: THE BILLBOARD BAND YEAR BOOK, September 26, 1942.

Above: DAILY NEWS, September 7, 1942.

THE BILLBOARD, November 14, 1942: NIGHT CLUB REVIEW - CLUB TROUVILLE, HOLLYWOOD
....Loumell Morgan Trio offers boogie tunes. Morgan, pianist and composer, turns in a good piano, with James Jackson hitting out on the guitar against a swell bass by Lynwood Jones. Trio also offers originals and plenty of blues. Vocal renditions are plenty good.

A trumpet man is added to the Morgan trio, and Buddy Rich, formerly of Tommy Dorsey's band, takes over the drums. From then on it's jam-jam-jam, with patrons eating it up.



Above: DETROIT FREE PRESS, March 11, 1944.

At Left: PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, October 19, 1943.




Above: Label image for Super Disc 1000A released in September 1945. This is the first record released on Super Disc. The flip-side is an instrumental, "Blues My Mama Wouldn't Teach Me", composed by "Morgan-Jackson-Smith". The above label image shows the group members as: "Loumell Morgan, piano; Ham Jackson, guitar; Jimmy Smith, bass" and the composer as "Morgan". The "MF" matrix numbering system was used throughout the life of the Super Disc label. It may have stood for the owner's initials, Viola Marsham and Irving Feld.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
"What In The World Am I Goin' To Do" - Loumell Morgan Trio - Super Disc 1000A - 1945.


Above: THE BILLBOARD, May 26, 1945. (NOTE: The record numbers, 1000 & 1001) are incorrectly switched. The Loumell Morgan Trio was "new" to the new Super Disc label, but had been performing for over three years before.)

SUPER DISC RECORDS:
  • Owners: Viola Marsham and Irving Feld.
  • Location: New York City (with possible offices in Washington, DC).
  • Type of Music: Rhythm and Blues, Jazz, Gospel, Country And Western.
  • No subsidiary or affiliate labels.
  • Existed from 1945 to 1948, although in August 1949, Irving Feld stated that "the local company [Super Disc] is still producing numbers" (possibly for sale to M-G-M).
    (REF: The Billboard dated August 20, 1949)
  • Catalog sold to M-G-M Records in June 1948.

The first two releases on Super Disc Records are by the Loumell Morgan Trio. Other artists with records on the label include Sid Catlett All Stars, Jimmy Crawley And His Musical Chips, Sunny Williams' Trio, Doles Dickens Quartet, Bull Moose Jackson, Viola Watkins, The Blues Boys Featuring Guitar Slim, The Velvetones, and Snub Mosley.




Above Left: Label image for Super Disc 1027 released in March 1947. It is the third of five records this group had on the Super Disc label. The band's ensemble performs the vocal.

Above Right Top: DAILY NEWS, May 15, 1945.

Above Right Bottom: KINGSTON DAILY FREEMAN, May 23, 1952.

NEW YORK AGE, December 1, 1945:
....Jimmy Crawley, songwriter and clarinet artist, who has his trio at Showboat Bar And Grill in the Bronx, has written the lyrics to two tunes, namely "Three Blind Mice" and "Include Me Out", which is scheduled to be recorded on Capitol Records by the King Cole Trio....

PITTSBURGH COURIER, February 22, 1957: JIMMY CRAWLEY DISCS FOR SUPER
NEW YORK—Jimmy Crawley, brother of the famous Wilton Crawley, who was at one time world-renowned comedian, acrobat, and clarinetist, has come into his own fame as a song writer for King Cole, Louis Jordan, and the Mills Brothers. Recently he climbed another rung on the ladder of success by signing with the Super Disc Record Company, which will guarantee him at least sixteen sides a year.

While appearing at the Bowery Club in Washington, Jimmy and his Musical Chips recorded "They'll Do It Every Time", My Day Is Complete", "Easter Sunday", and "I'm Glad 'Twas You". All of the tunes feature the voice of the guitarist, Cortland Carter. The group is handled by Lindsey Davis of Washington. Their next engagement will be at a Newport News (Va.) nitery beginning Sunday.

(NOTE: All of the above mentioned tunes were released on Super Disc. Crawley had a total of five records released on the label.)

The Billboard Review (4/5/47):

JIMMY CRAWLEY — Super Discs 1026/1027....
These Harlem jive and jump ditties are all fashioned by Jimmy Crawley and sung by him in backroom barrelhouse style. His pipes are husky and rhythmic, with assist from a trio and a small unit of tenor sax and rhythm instruments. It's the riff dittying in lively fashion for What About Your Soul?, Glamorous Jive, and a drinking song in Lay It On The Line, all following the same musical pattern that is none too potent. Crawley blows a soprano sax with the band for an instrumental Boogie Woogie Baby and takes jazz back to cradle days. Harlem backrooms may lay it on the line for Lay It On The Line.

Above Left: Label image for Super Disc 1045 released in July 1947. It is the first of two records Bull Moose Jackson had on the Super Disc label. His band's vocal ensemble backs Bull Moose on this one.

Above Right: Photo of Bull Moose Jackson.

At Direct Left: THE CASH BOX, July 14, 1947.

BULL MOOSE JACKSON:
Bull Moose Jackson was a rhythm and blues star on Sid Nathan's Cincinnati based King and Queen labels. He was vocalist, saxophonist, and orchestra leader. He had releases on King as "Bull Moose Jackson And His Buffalo Bearcats", as well as with the Lucky Millinder Orchestra.

Bull Moose had hits with "I Know Who Threw The Whiskey In The Well" (Queen, 1946), "I Love You Yes I Do" (King, 1947), "I Want A Bowlegged Woman" (King, 1948), and "Big Ten Inch Record" (King, 1952). These last two are double-entendre songs. King Records would enjoy tremendous success in that type of song with "Sixty Minute Man" by The Dominoes (1951) and "Work With Me Annie" by The Midnighters (1954) on their Federal label.

The Cash Box Review (7/14/47):

BULL MOOSE JACKSON — Super Disc 1045....
Keep Your Big Mouth Shut/Memphis Gal

A super-disc — that's with this one! Bull Moose Jackson, one of the more capable musicians floating around, steps out with his right foot as he offers this splendid piece aimed at the race spots just waiting for coin play. "Keep Your Big Mouth Shut", with beat aplenty, and some wonderful breaks by the band, is a cinch to clinch that extra phono spot on your machine [jukebox].

Bull Moose wails his tale in top fashion, as he tells phono fans of his "high" affair, with the wind-up revolving around the title. Echoing one of the smaller combos around, the maestro's rendition will liven up lagging phono play in many spots. On the flip with "Memphis Gal", Bull goes off the deep end on some blues done up really brown, with a spot of fine ivory roll in there. Peg the top deck for moola galore.

The Billboard Review (8/9/47):

BULL MOOSE JACKSON — Super Disc 1045....
Keep Your Big Mouth Shut/Memphis Gal

Altho an ordinary rhythm and blues shouter, Bull Moose Jackson has the advantage of song material in Keep Your Big Mouth Shut to carry the spin. His small jump band provides a shuffle boogie background rhythm along with responsive vocal assist by the entire ensemble. Fares much better than the slow race blues on the mated side, taking it in good stride for the easy rider Memphis Gal blues about his big fat gal. Title may bring some coin attention to Keep Your Big Mouth Shut.


Above Left: Label image for Super Disc 1047 released in December 1947. It is the first of two records by Viola Watkins on the Super Disc label.

Above Middle: THE CASH BOX, December 27, 1947. (Note the "Order Form" and "Or From"... cute.)

Above Right: PITTSBURGH COURIER, August 1, 1953. NEW WAX OUT—
Viola Watkins, singing pianist, has two more waxings on the record racks: "Grunt Your Last Time Daddy" backed by "My Real Fine Man" [sic]. Miss Watkins is appearing at the Red Hill in The Bronx, New York. Cliff Martinez is her manager.
(NOTE: The above mentioned record was released on Rama RR-8. Viola is co-composer of the "Real Fine Man" side.)

VIOLA WATKINS:
Viola Watkins was a pianist, singer, and composer. Her first record was on Chicago's Ebony label released in 1945. All four Super Disc sides were re-issued on M-G-M in 1948/1949. In addition to the two Super Disc records, she had two releases on the Jubilee label, one as a single artist in 1949 and one backed by the uncredited Crows, on one side (Paint A Sky For Me), in 1952.

Viola also sang lead with The Crows on one side (Seven Lonely Days) on Rama Records (1953). She is co-composer of The Crows' big hit "Gee" on Rama (1953), and plays piano on it.

The Cash Box Review (12/13/47):

VIOLA WATKINS — Super Disc 1047....
It's Right Here For You/You're In Love With Every One

Scat singing of chirp Viola Watkins echoes here in teeming tones that may hatch coin play galore. Viola's warbling shows mellow with her tonsils spilling in easy manner. Ops with race spots should look into this pancake — the gal can sing!

The Billboard Review (12/20/47):

VIOLA WATKINS (THE SUPER JAZZMEN) — Super Disc 1047....
It's Right Here For You
(73) Should do well on race jukes. Nice clarinet solo with good rhythm beat by bass and drums.
You're In Love With Every One (66) Vocal chore by Watkins makes disk above average.

(NOTE: A ratings range of 40-69 was considered "satisfactory" and 70-79 was "good".)

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): [Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]
1. "Lay It On The Line" - Jimmy Crawley's Musical Chips - Super Disc 1027 - 1947.
2. "Keep Your Big Mouth Shut" - Bull Moose Jackson - Super Disc 1045 - 1947.
3. "It's Right Here For You" - Viola Watkins - Super Disc 1047 - 1947.
4. "You're In Love With Every One" - Viola Watkins - Super Disc 1047 - 1947.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO IN FILM:

Above: Movie poster for the 1943 film "Melody Parade", a musical starring Mary Beth Hughes, Eddie Quillan, and Tim Ryan. The Loumell Morgan Trio (shown in the center of the above poster with Loumell standing at the piano) play and sing two songs in this film, "Them There Eyes" and "Watcha Know, Joe?"

Also, in 1943, the Loumell Morgan Trio performed for a full-length picture "All By Myself" and a cartoon "Boogie Woogie Man Will Get You If You Don't Watch Out" (in which they play and sing the title song depicted as ghosts). Rosemary Lane (of Lane Sisters fame), Evelyn Ankers, Patric Knowles, and Neil Hamilton star in "All By Myself" and the Trio entertain with the song "Let It Ride".

At Left: Movie Poster for the 1943 film "All By Myself".

LINCOLN CLARION, October 17, 1947:
....Loumell Morgan gets leave of absence from his music billing on the WOR "Harlem Hospitality Club" program to go to Hollywood to begin work with a Universal two-picture contract, also contracts for two night club engagements. The Loumell Morgan Trio is quite a musical novelty these days, on stage, radio, and recordings....
(NOTE: No evidence of release for either of the two movies could be found.)

LISTEN TO AUDIO ONLY (USING WINDOWS MEDIA PLAYER):
1. "Them There Eyes" - Loumell Morgan Trio - Melody Parade - 1943.
2. "Watcha Know, Joe?" - Loumell Morgan Trio - Melody Parade - 1943.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

STILL SHOTS Of THE LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO FROM THE MOVIE "MELODY PARADE":



EXTRA AUDIO (Windows Media Player): LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO ON THE APOLLO LABEL


At Far Left: THE CASH BOX, October 28, 1946. (NOTE: The Loumell Morgan Trio are wearing bow ties!)

At Direct Left: Label images for Apollo 1019 recorded on August 9, 1946 and released in October 1946. The labels show the members as "Loumell Morgan, Piano; Lynwood Jones, Bass; James Jackson, Guitar". It is the first of two records by the Loumell Morgan Trio on the Apollo label (1946/47).

The Cash Box Review (9/30/46):

LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO — Apollo 1019.... Bow Tie Jim/Blues In The Night
The Loumell Morgan Trio here offer a neat little "race type" novelty in "Bow Tie Jim", which, as the title implies, is about a guy with a bow tie. However, aside from the catchy lyrics, the music made by the three who handle a piano, bass, and guitar is worthy of notice. Their arrangements are tricky and good. Add that to the fact that their voices combine well to produce a really pleasant harmony, and you have a disk that's worth a place on the boxes, provided your locations are right.

Flipped, the boys do the standard, "Blues In The Night", but here there was too much conversation, jabberwocky conversation at that, to make a favorable impression on this reviewer no matter how unique their arrangement is. We like the tune, but we like it best when done straight, the way it was done in its heyday. And I'm sure most cutomers would agree with that.

The Billboard Review (10/26/46):

LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO — Apollo 1019.... Blues In The Night/Bow Tie Jim
One of the better combinations of piano, guitar, and bass, along the cocktailerie circuits, the Loumell Morgan (piano) Trio brings a refreshing and distinctive styling to the spinning sides. There is a high degree of individuality in their unison and harmony singing for "Blues In The Night". And also at a bright tempo for Morgan's own rhythm novelty, "Bow Tie Jim", which shows off his Steinwaying. The familiar "Blues In The Night" spins with freshness here and may tempt the nickel spenders in a goodly manner.
LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Blues In The Night" - Loumell Morgan Trio - Apollo 1019 - 1946.
2. "Bow Tie Jim" - Loumell Morgan Trio - Apollo 1019 - 1946.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


The Cash Box 3/3/47


THE MONTCLAIR TIMES, June 27, 1946: LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO AT THE CAROUSEL
The Loumell Morgan Trio....are now appearing nightly at Carousel, Essex House. The vocal and instrumental team, with a piano, guitar, and bass fiddle as background for their unusual vocal arrangements, is rated musically tops in entertainment value. The trio was featured throughout the war on such G.I. shortwave broadcasts as "Mail Call", "Command Performance", and "Jubilee". They are, at present, starring in the CBS Tuesday evening program "Night Life".

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): "It Had To Be You" - Loumell Morgan Trio - AFRS Jubilee 106 - 3-10-45.

THE BILLBOARD NIGHT CLUB REVIEW, December 7, 1946: THE DOWNBEAT, NEW YORK
NEW YORK: ....On the spot's talent roster are the Loumell Morgan Trio. Morgan, who plays piano while standing, beating out tempos a la Maurice Rocco, has Duke Jones slapping a bass and giving with jive vocals that make good returns, and Ham Jackson displaying lots of speed on the guitar. ....The trio's unison vocals....were well done. Mixture of standards and novelties proved satisfactory fare for those who were more interested in listening than they were in gabbing.

THE BILLBOARD, June 4, 1949:
NEW YORK: ....The Loumell Morgan Trio cut four sides for the new Manhattan label in New York City last week....
(NOTE: In between the two 1946/47 Apollo releases and the lone 1949 Manhattan release, the Loumell Morgan Trio had one record in 1947 on the Sterling label backing Claude Maxwell.)

PITTSBURGH COURIER, December 3, 1949: LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO ON GODFREY VIDEO SHOW TIME
NEW YORK—The Loumell Morgan Trio, currently holding forth at Wells' Music Bar, took time out from their band stand chores to appear on the Arthur Godfrey radio and video show last Monday before the holiday. Godfrey has been using professional talent to supplement the "Talent Scout" gimmick in order to strengthen the appeal of the show and the Morgan three soared high with listening and looking guests.

TRADE MAGAZINE, March 1950:
....Columbia Records' blues and rhythm department grabbed off a couple of additional talents for its drive for contention in that market. Newest artists include Loumell Morgan Trio and the Six LaMotta Brothers, a calypso group which works with the Millard Sisters and El Boy, a chanter, [doing the vocals] on wax. Initial releases on both these artists will be out this month....
(NOTE: One side of Morgan's only record for Columbia is "Calypso Boogie". Wonder if that was a result of any involvement with the mentioned calypso group. The Loumell Morgan Trio also had a "calypso tempo" side on their Atlantic Records' 1952 release.)

PITTSBURGH COURIER, May 13, 1950: LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO PLATTERS COINING LOOT
NEW YORK—Latest Columbia record sales show the Loumell Morgan Trio way up on top as one of the most popular attractions on the label. Company officials consider this amazing since the trio is the firm's latest acquisition and has only cut one platter to date. The disc is "Calypso Boogie" and "The Devil In Me", the latter a Morgan original.
(NOTE: The Billboard rated the sides of this record as 61 and 63, respectively. That is considered "satisfactory" only. Even though "one of the most popular attractions", the Loumell Morgan Trio had no more records on the Columbia label.)

PITTSBURGH COURIER, August 19, 1950: LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO GETS CANADIAN RECALL
VAL D'OR, CANADA—The Loumell Morgan Trio, which completed a successful engagement in Grand Mere, Quebec, last week, had no sooner hit its home town of New York City when the management of the Morocco Club, here in Val D'or, summoned the Morganites back for a stint. The trio comprises Loumell Morgan, pianist-leader; Newell (Johnny) Johns, guitarist; and Jim Jam Smith, bass.

Above Left: SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY SUN, October 16, 1947.

Above Right: DAILY NEWS, October 29, 1948.

Above Left: SUNDAY NEWS, June 30, 1946: THEY MAKE WITH THE JUMP-STYLED MUSIC
The Loumell Morgan Trio, coast to coast radio and night club favorites, are now appearing at the Carousel, Essex House, Newark. The trio makes with the jump-styled music and also with the sweet stuff and have made a great hit with the Jersey folk.

Above Right: THE GAZETTE (Montreal, Canada), October 18, 1950: AT THE CONTINENTAL
The Loumell Morgan Trio are appearing nightly, starting tonight, at the Continental Cafe. They dance as well as sing and play....

(NOTE: The Loumell Morgan Trio were consistent over time with wearing bow ties.)

Above Left: THE GAZETTE (Montreal, Canada), October 23, 1950.

Above Right: THE GAZETTE (Montreal, Canada), October 17, 1950.

Above Left: NEWARK ADVOCATE (OHIO), February 6, 1950. (NOTE: This clipping gives a good resume of the Loumell Morgan Trio's portfolio.)

Above Right: WASHINGTON AFRO-AMERICAN, September 2, 1952: MORGAN CHOSE MUSIC OVER SCHOOL JOB
NEW YORK—Loumell Morgan, whose trio is one of the most popular small combos on the entertainment scene, almost became a school teacher in his younger days.

NEW YORK AGE, May 23, 1953: LOUMELL MORGAN TOPS AS "SINGLE"
NEW YORK—Loumell Morgan performing as a solo pianist, rather than a leader of various small groups, is teriffic. Loumell, now shooting toward his fifth month at Arthur's Cafe in Greenwich Village, finds he has more freedom of expression as a single, and is exploiting his new-found musical liberty to the fullest.

NEW YORK AGE, August 15, 1953: "SWING STREET" JUMPS TO BEAT OF MORGAN MEN
NEW YORK—Fifty-Second, known as New York's "Swing Street" for years, is wailing these nights to the torrid renderings of the Loumell Morgan Trio. The Morgan men, comprising of Brew Moore on tenor sax, Kenny Clark on drums, and the leader on piano, are playing the big town's fabulous jazz stem after a prolonged absense.

Morgan himself had been doing solo work in Greenwich Village, and running jamsessions which turned into remarkable panoramas of modern jazz. The new Morgan threesome is a direct outgrowth of these sessions.

PITTSBURGH COURIER, August 1, 1953: LOUMELL MORGAN REVAMPS OUTFIT FOR ZANZIBAR
NEW YORK—Loumell Morgan has brought a brand new trio into the Club Zanzibar on New York's famed Swing Street (Fifty-Second). The new outfit features drums and tenor sax and is a departure from the piano-bass-guitar instrumentation of Morgan's previous groups. The new group developed from the jam sessions Loumell has been holding in Greenwich Village for the past several months.

Brew Moore is on tenor sax and Kenny Clark is on the drums. Both musicians had played with Morgan during his informal stints in the Village, as had such other stellar performers as Don Joseph, Allan Eager, and guitarists Ronnie Singer and Gene Olsen.


NOTE: Most discographical information provided at this website is from Ferdie Gonzalez' Disco-File.


Listen to all this week's selections using Windows Media Player:
[Audio restoration by Dave Saviet.]

          1. "What In The World Am I Goin' To Do" - Loumell Morgan Trio - Super Disc 1000A - 1945.
          2. "Lay It On The Line" - Jimmy Crawley's Musical Chips - Super Disc 1027 - 1947.
          3. "Keep Your Big Mouth Shut" - Bull Moose Jackson - Super Disc 1045 - 1947.
          4. "It's Right Here For You" - Viola Watkins - Super Disc 1047 - 1947.
          5. "You're In Love With Every One" - Viola Watkins - Super Disc 1047 - 1947.
          6. "Them There Eyes" - Loumell Morgan Trio - Melody Parade - 1943.
          7. "Watcha Know, Joe?" - Loumell Morgan Trio - Melody Parade - 1943.
          8. "Blues In The Night" - Loumell Morgan Trio - Apollo 1019 - 1946.
          9. "Bow Tie Jim" - Loumell Morgan Trio - Apollo 1019 - 1946.
        10. "It Had To Be You" - Loumell Morgan Trio - AFRS Jubilee 106 - 3-10-45.
 
          ALL TEN ABOVE SONGS played in sequence.
 
          ALL SIX SONGS ABOVE BY THE LOUMELL MORGAN TRIO played in sequence.



           [To download audio files, right-click on song title link and then select "Save link (target) as..."]


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